phosphate


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Related to phosphate: calcium phosphate, phosphate fertilizer

phosphate

 [fos´fāt]
any salt or ester of phosphoric acid. adj., adj phosphat´ic.

Phosphates are widely distributed in the body, the largest amounts being in the bones and teeth. They are continually excreted in the urine and feces and must be replaced in the diet. Inorganic phosphates function as buffer salts to maintain the acid-base balance in blood, saliva, urine, and other body fluids. The principal phosphates in this buffer system are monosodium and disodium phosphate. Organic phosphates, in particular adenosine triphosphate (ATP), take part in a series of reversible reactions involving phosphoric acid, lactic acid, glycogen, and other substances, which furnish the energy expended in muscle contraction. This is thought to occur through the hydrolysis of the so-called high-energy phosphate bond present in ATP, phosphocreatine, and certain other body compounds.

phos·phate (P),

(fos'fāt),
A salt or ester of phosphoric acid. For individual phosphates not listed here, see under the name of the base.

phosphate

/phos·phate/ (fos´fāt) any salt or ester of phosphoric acid.phosphat´ic

phosphate (PO43-)

[fos′fāt]
1 an anion of phosphoric acid.
2 a salt of phosphoric acid. Phosphates are extremely important in living cells, particularly in the storage and use of energy and the transmission of genetic information within a cell and from one cell to another. See also adenosine diphosphate, adenosine triphosphate, phosphorus.

phos·phate

(fos'fāt)
1. A salt or ester (especially inorganic) of phosphoric acid.
2. The trivalent ion, PO43-.

phosphate

any salt or ester of any PHOSPHORIC ACID.

Phosphate

An organic compound necessary for mineralization of bone and other key cellular processes.
Mentioned in: Hyperparathyroidism

phosphate

any salt or ester of phosphoric acid.
1. Phosphates are widely distributed in the body, the largest amounts being in the bones and teeth. They are continually excreted in the urine and feces, and must be replaced in the diet. Inorganic phosphates function as buffer salts to maintain the acid-base balance in blood, saliva, urine and other body fluids. The principal phosphates in this buffer system are monosodium and disodium phosphate. Organic phosphates, in particular adenosine triphosphate (ATP), are used to store the chemical bond energy released during the oxidation of compounds such as glycogen or fatty acids, which may later be expended in muscle contraction. This is thought to occur through the hydrolysis of the so-called high-energy phosphate bond present in ATP, phosphocreatine and certain other body compounds. See also hypophosphatemia, hyperphosphatemia.
2. used extensively in agricultural industry as fertilizers and organic compounds as cleaning agents.

phosphate binders
usually aluminum carbonate or hydroxide preparations, used to bind phosphates and limit their absorption from the intestine. Used in the treatment of the hyperphosphatemia of renal failure.
phosphate buffer
important phosphate-containing buffers.
phosphate buffered saline
a special phosphate buffered saline used in tissue cultures and for the storage and transport of bovine embryos. Abbreviated PBS.
phosphate calculi
see struvite urolith.
dietary phosphate
supplementation of the diet with phosphate in some form is a very common practice in farm animals. Materials used include rock phosphate (defluorination may be necessary), sodium dihydrogen phosphate produced by the agricultural chemical industry, calcium triphosphate and bone meal or flour.
inorganic phosphate
any salt of phosphoric acid.
phosphate retention
a phenomenon resulting from reduced glomerular filtration; contributes to a chronic hypocalcemic state.
phosphate ridge
see mineralization front.
phosphate rock
phosphate yielding endonucleases
a class of ribonuclease involved in the usually fairly rapid turnover of RNA in the cell that degrades RNA by cleavage of the phosphodiester bonds within the molecule.
References in periodicals archive ?
The YPH JV, which includes a world-scale phosphate rock mine producing approximately 2.
The needs of the phosphate fertiliser complexes were also to be met by these units.
Phosphate minerals on Earth, like fluorapatite and whitlockite, take their time to dissolve, they are also not readily incorporated into a water-based solution, which is why their concentration are relatively low.
Operating with little regard for the looming phosphate shortage, the countries and private firms that control the resource focus mostly on maximizing their short-term economic welfare.
one Rum Jungle Resources share as consideration for every 20 Central Australian Phosphate shares.
Phosphate control has become an emerging concern due to large observational studies that have demonstrated the link between elevated phosphate levels and all-cause mortality in patients requiring dialysis (Block, Hulbcn-Shearon, levin.
Anchored in OCP's Jorf Phosphate Hub in Jorf Lasfar, in Morocco, this new investment is part of a broader and ongoing investment program, totaling 7 billion dollars over 7 years, the group underlined.
This is no easy task, however, as phosphates have many functions in ensuring that tableware is properly cleaned and rinsed.
Local consumption of phosphate amounts to around 600 to 700 thousand tons at the Homs fertilizer factory, where it is used to manufacture phosphoric acid and triple super phosphate fertilizer.
The governor was briefed on the ongoing construction works of the huge phosphate mining complex at Al Jalamid and its social and economic effect on the development of the region.
Phosphate is an essential nutrient that occurs naturally in the diet.
Used phosphorous is excreted mostly as sodium ammonium phosphate and ends up in sewage.