phosgene gas

phosgene gas

Carbonyl chloride, COCl2 Toxicology A gas produced when an organic material burns with chlorine or chloride–eg, chlorinated hydrocarbons, plastics, and other materials; once in the alveoli, phosgene is hydrolyzed and forms HCl, compromising the lungs' diffusing capacity and evokes edema
References in periodicals archive ?
We all know the cold stories of phosgene gas and the asphyxiating images of suppressed trenches, but World War I was not a mere Eurocentric event.
In the process modeled, phosgene gas was added to the liquid phase as gas bubbles, and hence the entire reaction system was a three-phase system (gas-liquid [aqueous phase]-liquid [organic phase]).
You don't know what kind of reaction you'll get, says Pinto, " but most of them are going to be bad." He adds that simple household materials, such as bleach and ammonia--when mixed--can quickly become phosgene gas, which is a colorless deadly gas.
Burning fabrics such as wool release toxic cyanide gas, and smoldering plastic can generate hydrochloric acid and phosgene gas (a nerve poison) as well as blinding, thick black smoke.
KIN-TEK's Trace Source Permeation Tubes are used to blend gas calibration standards of phosgene gas. Mixtures are adjustable in concentration and can range from sub-ppb (with secondary dilution) to several hundred ppm.
The briefing noted that Germany's highly developed chemical industry had already created large stocks of mustard and phosgene gas, which were said to be on the move.
When a small container of chloroform turned up at Churchill, Waddell said: "I'm going to assume it's got phosgene gas in the head space."
That produced phosgene gas, used as a chemical weapon in WWI.
Formulations have been developed for neutralizing malathion, hydrogen cyanide, sodium cyanide, butyl isocyanate, carbon disulfide, phosgene gas, capsaicin in commercial pepper spray, chlorine gas, anhydrous ammonia gas; hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, formaldehyde, ethylene oxide, methyl bromide, boron trichloride, fluorine, tetraethyl pyrophosphate, phosphorous trichloride, arsine, and tungsten hexafluoride.
British gas experts began releasing phosgene gas from hundreds of canisters at 3 a.m.
The Ministry of Supply's Valley Works was a key chemical weapons production and storage facility during World War II, producing forms of mustard and phosgene gas.
Army Chemical Warfare Service rose from $2 million in 1940 to more than $1 billion in 1942, and large stocks of mustard and phosgene gas were readied for use if Hitler ignored the clear warnings of massive retaliation from President Franklin Roosevelt.