phoria

phoria

 [for´e-ah]
any tendency to deviation of the eyes from the normal when fusional stimuli are absent or fusion is otherwise prevented; a latent or usually unmanifested tropia; see also heterophoria.

phor·i·a

(fōr'ē-ă),
The relative directions assumed by the eyes during binocular fixation of a given object in the absence of an adequate fusion stimulus. See: cyclophoria, esophoria, exophoria, heterophoria, hyperphoria, hypophoria, orthophoria.
[G. phora, a carrying, motion]

phoria

/pho·ria/ (fo´re-ah) heterophoria.

phor·i·a

(fōr'ē-ă)
The relative directions assumed by the eyes during binocular fixation of a given object in the absence of an adequate fusion stimulus.
See: cyclophoria, esophoria, exophoria, heterophoria, hyperphoria, hypophoria, orthophoria
[G. phora, a carrying, motion]

phoria 

Synonym for heterophoria as well as orthophoria.
References in periodicals archive ?
between 2 esophoria and 8 exophoria, Figure 4(b)) as well as distance vertical phoria and near vertical phoria (NVP) (i.
35,36) In addition, prisms can be considered at the beginning of VT to reduce overall demands on the binocular visual system when the magnitude of phoria is high, or even at the end of VT in symptomatic patients.
They included NPC break and recovery, horizontal near phoria using the von Graefe prism dissociation method, horizontal near PFV and negative fusional vergence (NFV) ranges, vergence prism facility (with 12 prism diopter [[DELTA]] base-out [BO] and 3[DELTA] base-in [BI] prism flippers), and stereoacuity using the Titmus stereo test.
These components of the examination were stereo acuity as measured by random dot stereograms (RDSs) using the Randot stereotest, near point of convergence (NPC), ocular alignment at distance and at near determined by cover test, distance phoria (lateral and vertical) and gradient accommodative convergence/accommodation ratio using the von Graefe technique, and the amplitude of accommodation (AOA) measured by phorometry using the minus lens to blur method.
5) In the presence of a binocular vision anomaly, particularly while undertaking a challenging visual task, these demands will be significantly increased, highlighting the importance of managing decompensated phoria in these individuals.
found three vergence abnormalities present as related to the phoria: 38 percent exhibited an abnormal horizontal phoria at near, 18 percent exhibited an abnormal vertical phoria at near, and 26 percent manifested an abnormal horizontal phoria at far [12].
Additionally, a higher percentage of abnormalities were observed in the mTBI group with regard to the stimulus AC/A ratio, PRA/NRA, and near horizontal phoria.
Displacement of the nonius markers on the Mallett unit indicates a fixation disparity, and the prism required to align the markers is an indication of the associated phoria.
Horizontal phorias are typically benign and asymptomatic, although in some cases, a naturally occurring phoria will cause intermittent horizontal diplopia, usually with near vision, or more vague visual symptoms that can be hard to characterize.
A very simple five-step approach can often be enough to alleviate symptoms of a decompensated phoria.
Firstly, it is of paramount importance to distinguish between a compensated phoria (which is normal), and a symptomatic, decompensated phoria.