phoresy


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Related to phoresy: inquilinism

pho·re·sis

(fō-rē'sis), Do not confuse this word with pheresis.
1. Synonym(s): electrophoresis
2. A biologic association in which one organism is transported by another, as in the attachment of the eggs of Dermatobia hominis, a human and cattle botfly, to the legs of a mosquito, which transports them to the human, cattle, or other host in which the botfly larvae can develop. Synonym(s): epizoic commensalism, phoresy
[G. phorēsis, a being borne]

phoresy

(fôr′ĭ-sē)
n.
An association between two species in which one transports the other, for example when a mite attaches to a beetle and is carried to a new food source.

pho·ret′ic (fə-rĕt′ĭk) adj.

phoresy

a method of dispersal, e.g. of insect pests, in which the insect clings to a moving animal or other insect. Includes transmission of a parasite by a parasite, e.g. Histomonas meleagridis by Heterakis gallinarum.
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References in periodicals archive ?
This report is the first to document chironomid phoresy on crayfish.
Notes on phoresy between Rheotanytarsus sp (Diptera: Chironomidae) and Tricorythodes sp.
The adaptive significance of phoresy by Phthiraptera (both Ischnocera and Anoplura) warrants further study.
Phoresy involving a nymph of Haematopinus eurysternus (Nitzsch) and Haematobia irritans exigua De Meijere.
Phoresy of sucking lice (Siphunculata: Linognathidae) by a mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae).
In this study it was noticed that phoresy was not a mandatory choice for every Uoorobovella deutonymph.
ferrugineus and the effects of this association may be more detrimental to the host than suggested by mere phoresy.
Phoresy of Uropoda orbicularis (Acari: Mesostigmata) by beetles (Coleoptera) associated with cattle dung in Poland.
Phoresy as migration: some functional aspects of phoresy.
Beier (1948) elaborated upon Vachon's review; he restricted phoresy to mean Vachon's active phoresy and coined the term phagophilia (= "love to eat") for his passive phoresy based on the assumption that the pseudoscorpions "ride" their hosts to feed upon the commensals and ectoparasites.
First, it is important to note that there are no reports of pseudoscorpions on packrats, ruling out phoresy as the primary association between these organisms.
The evolutionary step from nest commensal/mutualist to mouse commensal/mutualist is small indeed, and this relationship certainly is not simple phoresy.