phonotrauma

phonotrauma

Any abuse or misuse of the vocal cords (folds), more commonly seen in those with professional voices, which gives rises to various lesions (e.g., polyps, nodules, degenerative polyps, cysts, varices, papillomas) and other benign conditions.

phonotrauma

Any abuse or misuse of the vocal folds, most common in those with professional voices, which gives rises to various lesions–eg, polyps, nodules, degenerative polyps, cysts, varices, papillomas, and other benign conditions. See Singers' nodes.
References in periodicals archive ?
While those with singer's dystonia may sing often, their symptoms are not caused by phonotrauma or overuse.
Vocal hygiene education, voice production therapy, and the role of patient adherence: a treatment effectiveness study in women with phonotrauma.
Dikkers FG, Nikkels PG: Benign lesions of the vocal folds: histopathology and phonotrauma.
Awareness programs should be arranged for teachers that may focus on vocal symptoms and training on how to utilize different techniques to avoid vocal phonotrauma.
The authors identify the types and causes of phonotrauma, which is defined as "the result of vocal behavior either volitional or involuntary, impacting vocal fold vibration in a manner that compromises vocal fold integrity.
Acute laryngitis has a variety of causes, including viral, bacterial, or fungal infection and phonotrauma, among others.
There are also nonsurgical causes of vocal fold scar such as external trauma, phonotrauma, and vocal fold hemorrhage.
Fibrous or reactive hemorrhagic polyps often develop in response to phonotrauma at the junction of the anterior one-third and posterior two-thirds of the vocal fold.
6) Others have argued for acquired causes such as phonotrauma, vascular lesions, and postoperative scarring.
The cause of vocal fold polyps has generally been regarded to be phonotrauma from vocal overuse.
An example for voice might be to teach student singers about the relationship between vocal load and phonotrauma.