phonotrauma

phonotrauma

Any abuse or misuse of the vocal cords (folds), more commonly seen in those with professional voices, which gives rises to various lesions (e.g., polyps, nodules, degenerative polyps, cysts, varices, papillomas) and other benign conditions.

phonotrauma

Any abuse or misuse of the vocal folds, most common in those with professional voices, which gives rises to various lesions–eg, polyps, nodules, degenerative polyps, cysts, varices, papillomas, and other benign conditions. See Singers' nodes.
References in periodicals archive ?
They address the structure and function of the voice as it applies to these singers; vocal health and fitness, including the impact of phonotrauma on vocal health and singing, multidisciplinary care, laryngopharyngeal reflux, anesthesiology and the voice, the life cycle of the singing voice, and medicine, myths, and truths related to vocal health and hygiene; and vocal pedagogy, with discussion of classical and belting pedagogy, the physiology of belting, exercise physiology principles for training the vocal athlete, the application of motor learning principles to voice training, and audio technology.
Absolute voice rest is also not the proper treatment for vocal nodules, which are products of voice abuse (phonotrauma) and misuse.
Benign lesions of the vocal folds: Histopathology and phonotrauma. Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 1995; 104: 698-703.
In instances like this, alternate conditions such as phonotrauma or allergies may need to be considered as etiological factors relating to the individual's voice complaints.
It was not associated with any phonotrauma. Strobovideolaryngoscopy detected a hemorrhage into the vocal process granuloma (figure 3).
Vocal hygiene education, voice production therapy, and the role of patient adherence: a treatment effectiveness study in women with phonotrauma. J Speech Lang Hear Res.
Dikkers FG, Nikkels PG: Benign lesions of the vocal folds: histopathology and phonotrauma. Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 1995 Sep; 104(9 Pt 1): 698-703
Awareness programs should be arranged for teachers that may focus on vocal symptoms and training on how to utilize different techniques to avoid vocal phonotrauma.
While those with singer's dystonia may sing often, their symptoms are not caused by phonotrauma or overuse.
Acute laryngitis has a variety of causes, including viral, bacterial, or fungal infection and phonotrauma, among others.
The authors identify the types and causes of phonotrauma, which is defined as "the result of vocal behavior either volitional or involuntary, impacting vocal fold vibration in a manner that compromises vocal fold integrity." LeBorgne and Rosenberg enumerate the causes and effects of vocal fold irritation, and devote an entire chapter (authored by medical school professors) to the topic of reflux.
Fibrous or reactive hemorrhagic polyps often develop in response to phonotrauma at the junction of the anterior one-third and posterior two-thirds of the vocal fold.