phonosurgery

pho·no·sur·ger·y

(fō'nō-ser'jĕr-ē),
A group of operations designed to improve or alter the voice.

phonosurgery

/pho·no·sur·gery/ (-sur″jer-e) a group of surgical procedures whose purpose is to restore, maintain, or enhance the voice.

phonosurgery

ENT A procedure on the vocal cords and adjacent tissue intended to improve the voice's timbre, tone and quality Assessment techniques Acoustic and aerodynamic measurements, laryngeal stroboscopy, manual compression, and intraoperative monitoring of voice Surgical techniques Injection, laryngeal microsurgery, laryngeal framework modification–eg, medialization thyroplasty, laser techniques. See Injection technique, Laryngeal microsurgery. Cf Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chapters cover respiratory and laryngeal anatomy and physiology, vocal health, evaluation, vocal pathology, neurologically-based voice disorders, vocal rehabilitation, phonosurgery, the management of head and neck cancer, vocal performance, and drug types and their effects on the voice.
The book begins with a detailed review of respiratory and laryngeal anatomy and physiology, then coves vocal health, evaluation, vocal pathology, neurologically based voice disorders, vocal rehabilitation, phonosurgery, management of head and neck cancer, vocal performance, and drug types and effects on the voice.
Koufman pioneered work in laryngeal laser surgery, laryngopharyngeal reflux, laryngeal electromyography, laryngoplastic phonosurgery, and other forms of laryngeal (voice) rehabilitation surgery.
The applicability of the dysphonia severity index and the voice handicap index in evaluating effects of voice therapy and phonosurgery.
The surgery is known generally as laryngoplastic phonosurgery, meaning plastic surgery of the larynx to reposition the vocal folds and alter the voice.
Phonosurgery is an effective treatment for some vocal fold pathologies, and the Voice Handicap Index (VHI) survey has been shown to be a useful instrument for evaluating treatment effectiveness.
This nonrandomized, prospective study was undertaken to investigate subjective and objective outcomes measures in patients who underwent phonosurgery for non-neoplastic vocal fold lesions.
Patients were eligible for this study if (1) they demonstrated a voice impairment that affected their daily life, (2) they agreed to undergo phonosurgery in an attempt to imp rove their voice, (3) they agreed to complete a VHI survey preoperatively and 6 weeks postoperatively, and (4) they agreed to undergo acoustic and aerodynamic testing preoperatively and 6 weeks postoperatively.