phonology

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pho·net·ics

(fō-net'iks),
The science of speech and of pronunciation.
Synonym(s): phonology

phonology

/pho·nol·o·gy/ (fah-nol´ah-je) the science of vocal sounds.phonolog´ical

phonology

[fōnol′əjē]
the study of speech sounds, particularly the principles governing the way speech sounds are used in a given language.

phonology

(fo-nol'o-je) [ phono- + -logy]
The study of the speech sounds of a particular language at a particular time or place (e.g., 17th-century Mexican Spanish).
See: phonetics
References in periodicals archive ?
In the experimental condition, the target lexis contained meaning-form connections, that is, they were phonologically motivated.
Componential aspect of speech production does, of course, provide support for distinctive features but it should not lead us into thinking that every parameter of speech production is phonologically relevant.
3 Phonologically correct non-words used as printed sample stimuli (columns A, B, and C) and as spoken responses (columbus X and Y), (a) in Experiment 2.
The solution that we propose in this respect is that the phonologically motivated alternations discussed in this paper are morphological due to the morphological contrast they involve, their relative frequency and, above all, because they are related to the ablaut system of the strong verb.
The child is able to identify the target word when presented in a sheet, along with other terms (semantically related, phonologically similar pseudoword, phonologically similar word).
For the record, three of the rejected etymologies are phonologically viable but semantically rather strained Mon-Khmer linkages: (a) Tam[?
Besides, the metric they used to define similarity is vague since a phonologically similar-sounding word was defined by Ullman as having a monosyllabic stem which is "phonologically similar" to another existing word.
Phonologically integrated loanwords: these describe loanwords from contiguous languages to reflect a larger global culture but adapted to the phonological structure of the source language.
experimental lists) consisted of words that were related in one of three ways: (a) phonologically (e.
Development and testing of phonologically driven grizzly bear habitat models.
Poplack (1980) discusses two grammatical constraints on code- switching: (a) a free-morpheme constraint which states that a switch cannot occur between a lexical form and a bound morpheme unless the former has been phonologically integrated into the language of the latter and (b) the equivalence constraint rule which states that the word order immediately before and immediately after a switching point should exist in the two languages to make it possible for a switch to take place.
If your child has been listening and joining in to 'Jack and Jill went up the hill' then they should already be 'tuned in' and phonologically aware of rhyming words.