phonograph


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phonograph

(fō′nō-grăf) [″ + graphein, to write]
An instrument used for the reproduction of sounds recorded on vinyl.
References in periodicals archive ?
The circulation of pianola rolls and of phonograph records has also been proposed, with the same end in view, and has even been tried experimentally in one or two places.
Some of the earliest phonographs and gramophones have made tens of thousands of pounds.
Complimenting the authors of the book that traces the journey of Indian sound recording from the era of phonographs and wax cylinder recordings of early 1900s, the minister told the authors, "You have done a huge documentation work, worthy of highest praise.
Soon audiences were gathering to sit and listen to orchestral music played on a phonograph through a giant horn capable of filling a hall with sound, while smaller versions brought performances to the living room for the first time.
In 2003, I challenged this orthodoxy, demonstrating that the first use of the phonograph preceded Grainger's, and that most of the FSS's leadership accepted and used the machine, including Lucy Broadwood, Anne Gilchrist, Cecil Sharp, and Ralph Vaughan Williams.
Sutton, author of Recording the 'Twenties: The Evolution of the American Recording Industry, 1920-29, takes readers on a tour of the development of the phonograph and the beginnings of the American recording industry.
He grew up to become the father of 1000+ inventions, including the phonograph and light bulb.
The experts get in a tizzy over items including a phonograph once owned by Scottish entertainer Harry Lauder.
A consultant in genius thinking and a marketing veteran who is the great-grandniece of Thomas Edison are passionate to explain how readers can use in their own lives and businesses the same five competencies that the great American inventor did to invent the light bulb, the phonograph, moving pictures, the fax machine, and other innovations.
Box 472, Whitinsville, are interested in the collection of 33 and 78 rpm phonograph records.
The invention that first made Thomas Alva Edison famous wasn't the lightbulb but the phonograph.
I refer to the unnamed narrator/hero of the Broadway musical ``The Drowsy Chaperone,'' a man so besotted by a 1920s- era musical comedy that he played his scratchy phonograph record, bringing the show to life in his apartment to simultaneously revere and mock it as circumstances dictate.