phonograph


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phonograph

(fō′nō-grăf) [″ + graphein, to write]
An instrument used for the reproduction of sounds recorded on vinyl.
References in periodicals archive ?
After all, even John Philip Sousa, who warned that phonographs would harm babies, eventually allowed his music to be recorded.
Early phonographs and gramophones can make a lot more - like the HMV table-top horn gramophone that sold in 1995 for over PS14,000.
By it difficult passages may be correctly rendered for the pupil but once, after which he has only to apply to his phonograph for instructions.
Edison phonograph with brass horn and cylinders would probably be worth $395 to $695.
Caption: A collage of advertisements for Brunswick phonographs.
The phonograph may give us ^one,^ but hitherto there [begin strikethrough] is [end strikethrough] ^could be^ no record of fine [begin strikethrough] inflexions pronunciation [end strikethrough] ^spoken utterance^....
He traces the early history of recording music here to Western scholars in the early 1890s, when Edison's phonograph came to Korea.
The 19-year-old carpenter had emigrated from Italy three years earlier and set up a small woodworking shop to make phonograph cabinets.
Awed by the new technology which an American teacher brought into the country in 1901, General remembered the first Edison phonograph being played in his class at a primary school in Ligao town (now city) in Albay province.
A PARISHIONER OF MINE has a collection of old cylinder-type phonograph recordings--rather than the flat discs we are used to, these are sized and shaped like a soft-drink can.
1878: Thomas Edison patented the phonograph. 1897: The Women's Institute was founded at Stoney Creek, Ontario, by Adelaide Hoodless.
It was only after 1898 that mechanical refinements to the phonograph, in addition to the stability of wax cylinders and plastic discs, led to a rapid increase in its popularity.