phonogram

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phonogram

 [fo´no-gram]
a graphic record of a sound.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pho·no·gram

(fō'nō-gram),
A graphic curve depicting the duration and intensity of a sound.
[phono- + G. gramma, diagram]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pho·no·gram

(fō'nŏ-gram)
A graphic curve depicting the duration and intensity of a sound.
[phono- + G. gramma, diagram]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The WIPO Performances and Phonograms Treaty came in force on May 20, 2002, and has 96 contracting parties as its members.
Convention, this treaty secured protection in "phonograms" of
While much has been said about this famous phonogram, its disclosure of one of phonography's most peculiar consequences remains underanalyzed.
All phonograms were numbered randomly for presentation to each listener: total number of rotation variants was 11.
As opposed to ideograms and phonograms, determinatives signify neither the meaning nor the sound of a word.
actors, singers and musicians), producers of phonograms (sound recordings) and broadcasting organizations.
Once governments have transposed the directive into national law, these bodies will have the green light to digitize orphan works from the following categories, providing they follow the measure's conditions: printed works such as books and newspapers, cinematographic and audiovisual works, phonograms, works embedded in others works (e.g., book illustrations), and unpublished material such as letters.
Spelling instruction focuses on teaching students how to read and write 70 common phonograms (sound-symbols) and how to blend these phonograms into high-frequency words.
Chapter V: Owners of related rights (performers, producers of phonograms and broadcasting organizations).
The Rome Convention for the Protection of Performers, Producers of Phonograms and Broadcasting Organizations was accepted by members of BIRPI, the predecessor to the modern World Intellectual Property Organization, on October 26, 1961.