phonocardiography


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phonocardiography

 [fo″no-kahr″de-og´rah-fe]
the graphic recording of heart sounds and murmurs; by extension, the term includes pulse tracings (carotid, apex, and venous pulse). adj., adj phonocardiograph´ic.

Phonocardiography involves picking up, through a highly sensitive microphone, sonic vibrations from the heart which are then converted into electrical energy and fed into a galvanometer, where they are recorded on paper. The procedure is most useful when there is evidence of heart murmurs or unusual heart sounds, such as gallops, that are difficult to discern by the human ear.

pho·no·car·di·og·ra·phy

(fō'nō-kar'dē-og'ră-fē),
1. Recording of the heart sounds with a phonocardiograph.
2. The science of interpreting phonocardiograms.
[phono- + G. kardia, heart, + graphō, to record]

phonocardiography

/pho·no·car·di·og·ra·phy/ (fo″no-kahr″de-og´rah-fe) the graphic representation of heart sounds or murmurs; by extension, the term also includes pulse tracings (carotid, apex, and jugular pulses).phonocardiograph´ic

phonocardiography

[-kär′dē·og′rəfē]
Etymology: Gk, phone + kardia + graphein, to record
the recording of heart sounds and murmurs by a phonocardiograph.

phonocardiography

Echophonocardiography Cardiology A non-invasive technique that amplifies faint, low frequency sounds of blood flowing through the heart and great vessels, displaying them graphically; PCG encompasses carotid, apex, and venous pulse tracings Applications Diagnose heart valve defects, ventricular hypertrophy, left heart failure; PCG is usually performed in synchrony with EKG, and M-mode echocadiography or Doppler echocardiography, to match changes heard by PCG with the point at which they occur in the heart beat

pho·no·car·di·og·ra·phy

(fō'nō-kahr'dē-og'ră-fē)
1. Recording of the heart sounds with a phonocardiograph.
2. The science of interpreting phonocardiograms.
[phono- + G. kardia, heart, + graphō, to record]

phonocardiography

the graphic recording of heart sounds and murmurs; by extension, the term includes pulse tracings (carotid, apex and venous pulse).
Phonocardiography involves picking up, through a highly sensitive microphone, sonic vibrations from the heart which are then converted into electrical energy and fed into a galvanometer, where they are recorded on paper. The procedure is most useful when there is evidence of heart murmurs or unusual heart sounds, such as gallops, that are difficult to discern by the human ear. Most recordings are made through an externally applied microphone but intracardiac recordings, made through a phonocatheter, are possible.
References in periodicals archive ?
Diagnostics of heart valve diseases per textual diagnostic tasks (%) Investigated groups Independent Diagnostics diagnostics with DDA + and [+ or -] errors + or [+ or -] III 51 49 83 IV 48 52 82 V 65 35 91 VI Pediatric faculty 81 19 96 VI Medical faculty 73 27 98 Cardiologists 63 37 93 Therapeutist teachers 25 75 100 of medical institutes Therapeutist heads of 60 40 94 departments of therapy Therapeutist heads of 41 59 97 depart-ments of therapy, diagnostics by phonocardiography Investigated groups Diagnostics Reduction with DDA of errors with DDA in times (~) errors P * III 17 <0.
It became fashionable for almost every murmur, rub, or gallop to be sent for phonocardiography so that it could be measured and documented.
They would then talk with and examine the patient and perform phonocardiography, which enabled the resident to hear all of the heart sounds and see them recorded.
He was doing about 3 right-sided cardiac catheterizations a month but did a lot of phonocardiography.