phonic

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Related to phonically: phonetically

phonic

 [fon´ik, fo´nik]
1. vocal.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

phon·ic

(fon'ik, fō'nik),
Relating to the voice or to sound.
See also: phonetic.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

phon·ic

(fon'ik)
Relating to sound or to the voice.
See also: phonetic
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The specially equipped Verizon Wireless test vehicles simultaneously test seven wireless providers, using a computerized program to generate phonically diverse "conversations" and data transmissions.
In La Rabouilleuse, given Balzac's love of puns, which he particularly shared with young people like his character Mistigris, and the fact that Joseph, on finding himself the Count de Brambourg, "ce qui le fait souvent pouffer de rire au milieu de ses atais" (4: 540), before ending the book with several phonically twisted proverbs, might make one think that he was laughing at the homophonous Branbourg or "city of garbage or excrement." This possibility is rendered more convincing on recalling that the young Chevaliers de la Desoeuvrance had cried, perhaps prophetically, on learning of Agathe's and Joseph's imminent arrival, "Bran pour les Bridau!" (7)
The French language does not phonically differentiate between the words "sport" and "spore," so in the French text the pronunciation of these words will form a rhyme.
The first Stampian quatrain phonically and thematically recalls the model.
Did he not choose the liseron that plays such a large role in both the diary and the poetry because, phonically, it suggests the verb lire (even though the two are, of course, etymologically unrelated)?
The first syllable of the word for sun in Hebrew, shemesh, is the Hebrew word for name, shem, and the Hebrew word for Heaven, shamayim, is phonically similar to a hypothetical masculine plural form of the same root, which, if it occurred, would mean "frames." (24) Furthermore, the name of Noah's first-born son and the father of the line that will lead to Abram is also Shem, and his principal task is to repopulate the earth after God has ended his first relationship with humankind.
In this rich passage one might see--among other possibilities--a representation of the close connection between Cixous's mother and her writing, in the way in which her hand ("ma main"), her normal writing hand, phonically doubles itself, giving birth to "maman." The scene also puts into evidence the difference and division that exists between her and her mother, as the hand has become detached.
This phonically charged environment (re)sounds with the possibility of what Garrett Stewart calls the "accidents of audition" to which a sentence's semantic intent is always vulnerable, accidents that introduce possibilities the coherent discourse of patriarchy tries to contain or omit (4).
(11) The rhetorician's task, wrote the early modern linguist Elisha Coles, is to make the "Mother-Tongue"--a substance as "Ancient" and archaic as "Nature itself"--"familier" (Al) or domesticated within an econom y that is structurally and ideologically, as well as phonically, allied with the patriarchal family that is also invoked in de Courcelles' notion of "illustration." It is this imaginary identification of language as "Mother Tongue" or "langue maternelle," strikingly similar to Cixous' notion of ecriture feminine as an inscription of the "lost mother...