phonetics

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phonetics

 [fo-net´iks]
the science of vocal sounds.

pho·net·ics

(fō-net'iks),
The science of speech and of pronunciation.
Synonym(s): phonology

phonetics

[fōnet′iks]
Etymology: Gk, phone, voice
1 the science of speech sounds used in language.
2 a written code used by speech-language pathologists and linguists to represent speech sounds.

pho·net·ics

(fŏ-net'iks)
The science of speech and of pronunciation.

phonetics

The branch of linguistics concerned with the study of the speech sounds (phonemes) of a language and their classification and representation.

pho·net·ics

(fŏ-net'iks)
Science of speech and pronunciation. Phonetic tests are used to determine vertical dimensions of occlusion (e.g., in sounding 'ch,''j,' and 's,' anterior teeth are brought closer together).

phonetics (fōnet´iks),

n the study of the production and perception of speech sounds, including individual and group variations and their use in speech.
References in periodicals archive ?
Golestani and colleagues investigated brain structure in expert phoneticians - individuals who are specialised in the study of phonetics and need to able to distinguish accurately between very similar speech sounds and subtle regional accents.
physiotherapist-ALL phonetician-ADESS 'The mimic made the phonetician send the book to the physiotherapist.
Higgins's basis in the real phonetician, Henry Sweet, Reader in Phonetics at Oxford from 1901, but known personally by Shaw from the late 1870s, can in consequence be seen to take on additional significance.
This explains why phoneticians employ varying symbols to try to capture what is in reality a locus of possibilities, like the schwa.
Since clauses like the phonetician gave the book or the typologist gave to the boy are marginal in English (although possible under the right pragmatic conditions), while the likes of I bought a book and I took the book are perfectly fine, English seems to give more prominence to the number of participants (rather than semantic roles) in the encoding of three-participant events.
Starting April 22, Alex Jennings will take over from Jonathan Pryce as the fierce phonetician, while Joanna Riding -- a new recruit to the show as of early December -- continues as Cockney flowergirl Eliza.
2) The two authors of this article are experts in different fields: Ophaug is a native Norwegian and a phonetician who has specialized in the phonetics of singing; Jordheim is an American singer of Norwegian and Danish descent with a special interest in the phonetics and singing diction of the Scandinavian languages.
Arvo Eek carried on working as a senior researcher and a phonetician.
Until recently, Francis Lodwick (1619-1694) has largely been known to early modern scholars as phonetician and language-planner, but if one looks at his more obscure manuscripts, Lodwick emerges as "freethinker, pre-Adamite, Socinian, utopianist, alchemist, philosemite, supporter of divorce and usury, [and] avid reader of La Peyrere and Hierocles," according to Poole (Tutorial Fellow in English, New College, Oxford, UK), who here presents Lodwick's all but unknown short utopia A Country Not Named, chosen for publication because it draws together Lodwick's linguistic, social, and theological interests.
Given the lists of contents, illustrations, and abbreviations, a foreword by John Wells (the present professor of phonetics at University College London), a preface and acknowledgements by the authors at the beginning, and a long appendix on the historical background of phonetics in Europe, specimens of examination papers, International Phonetic Alphabet charts, notes, a list of interviews, a chronological bibliography of Jones's works, a list of references, and an index at the end, the body of the book consists of about 450 pages of richly illustrated text, interlaced with interesting photographs, on the life and work of Daniel Jones, Britain's leading phonetician in the first half of the twentieth century.
Indeed, even the phonetician John Wells has written a paper called "The Cockneyfication of RP?
I am a specialized phonetician for singers and have been working with solo singers and choirs within classical singing for more than twenty years, guiding first of all Norwegian singers through difficult pronunciation matters in many different languages, especially during recordings, or prior to important concerts.