phonetics

(redirected from phonetician)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

phonetics

 [fo-net´iks]
the science of vocal sounds.

pho·net·ics

(fō-net'iks),
The science of speech and of pronunciation.
Synonym(s): phonology

pho·net·ics

(fŏ-net'iks)
The science of speech and of pronunciation.

phonetics

The branch of linguistics concerned with the study of the speech sounds (phonemes) of a language and their classification and representation.

pho·net·ics

(fŏ-net'iks)
Science of speech and pronunciation. Phonetic tests are used to determine vertical dimensions of occlusion (e.g., in sounding 'ch,''j,' and 's,' anterior teeth are brought closer together).
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
For this reason forensic phoneticians have developed the "voice line-up" as a parallel to the long-standing identity parade and at the same time undertaken research into auditory memory.
The researchers found that an area of the brain known as the left pars opercularis - part of the Broca's area, a region of the brain involved in speech production but also in analysing and separating speech sounds - correlated with the amount of training in transcription that a phonetician had undergone.
The British phonetician Henry Sweet, one source for Henry Higgins's character, did see a clear boundary between animal noises and human articulations.
Stanley Ellis was Britain's best-known phonetician and pioneered the forensic analysis of voice recordings.
George Bernard Shaw's 1914 play Pygmalion is about the London phonetician Henry Higgins, who teaches a tattered flower-seller named Eliza Doolittle to lose her Cockney accent, thereby calling forth her inner Lady, transforming her character and life.
TALKING proper: it was noted by a leading phonetician that when HRH the Princess Royal opened the final phase of Grosvenor's Liverpool One shopping centre last Wednesday, the Duke of Westminster pronounced Chavasse Park as "Shar-vaze"
Pygmalion 'describes the transformation of a Cockney flower-seller, Eliza Doolittle, into a passable imitation of a duchess by the phonetician Professor Henry Higgins, who undertakes his task in order to win a bet and to prove his own points about English speech and the class system: he teaches her to speak standard English and introduces her successfully to social life, thus winning his bet, but she rebels against his dictatorial and thoughtless behaviour, and 'bolts' from his tyranny.
She credits Vaquero with being one of the principal columns in the development of the linguistic study of Puerto Rican Spanish, following in the exalted traditions of philologist and phonetician Tomas Navarro Tomas and lexicographer, teacher, and lawyer Augusto Malaret.
Though he's considerably more at ease with the plummy tones of Henry Higgins, Jefferson Mays makes the phonetician an insufferable, prissy bore.
Similarly, one can propose different alignment types for tritransitive constructions, for example, with a ditransitive verb and an additional Beneficiary (A phonetician gave a book to the bassoon player for the physiotherapist) or Causee (A physiotherapist made the phonetician give a book to the bassoon player) (Kittila, this issue).
The committee included Robert Bridges, the then Poet Laureate, playwright George Bernard Shaw, and the phonetician Daniel Jones.
--(1987): <<The Place of Phonetics in American Academia>>, en The Phonetician, CL, 44, 4-7.