phonetic


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

phonetic

 [fo-net´ik]
pertaining to the voice or to articulate sounds.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pho·net·ic

(fō-net'ik),
Relating to speech or to the voice.
See also: phonic.
[G. phōnētikos]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pho·net·ic

(fŏ-net'ik)
Relating to speech or to the voice.
See also: phonic
[G. phōnētikos]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Stop the strain with a phonetic alphabet decal, NSN 7960-00-243-9103.
Nexidia's phonetic searching pinpoints spoken words in word or phrase formats by analyzing the phonetic content of indexed audio or video files based on the similarity of sound.
It makes sense, though, to help a pupil identify a word in context by having him/her sound out the initial consonant and, if possible, to notice other phonetic elements when needed, to identify the unknown (See also, Weaver, 2000).
"This diversity can be found in the file formats, but also can be seen across curricula, " says Ham "For instance, there are a number of special phonetic symbols that are required in speech communications and linguistics.
This paper presents an OT analysis of stop epenthesis, which as well as reflecting the basic pattern of stop insertion can also model the available quantitative data on variability of stop epenthesis and the phonetic difference between epenthetic and underlying stops.
The agency's response -- the 'Coke PHONETIC CAN Campaign' -- addressed one of the fundamental social barriers preventing South Africans from finding common ground and understanding each other.
The Satya Nadella-led company has now released smart Phonetic keyboards for 10 Indian languages in Windows 10.
Khabtagaeva investigates phonetic, morphological, and semantic features of Altaic languages--Turkic, Mongolic, and Tungusic--that appear in Yeniseian languages.
Although this approach has some merit, studies dating as early as the 1960s and '70s draw attention to shortcomings that may potentially arise with phonetic imitation, and while some can easily be acknowledged, others address underlying issues that too often are marginalized.
class="MsoNormalThe languages in which pronunciation coincides with spelling are called phonetic, an adjective with the same etymological root as the English noun phone.