phone

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Related to phones: Smart phones

phone

(fōn) [Gr. phone, voice]
A single speech sound.

cell phone

, cellular phone
A portable telephone, used, for example, in ambulance-to-hospital communications and in 12-lead electrocardiogram transmission in some emergency medical systems. Although many people speculate that cellular phone use may increase the risk of brain cancers (e.g., gliomas or meningiomas), no correlation between moderate usage and cancer has been definitively identified.
References in periodicals archive ?
Woodland Hills accountant Eric Vancronk said a combination of cable TV and digital phone service was $120 a month when he signed up with Time Warner recently.
The college's own internal studies on text messaging and cell phones convinced Downing to focus his new program most on incoming freshmen.
One issue at Charles County, and at many schools that use wireless IP phones is the coverage area, which may not extend far beyond a building's boundary.
A quick look at some of the recent developments in cell phones will give you a sense of what's in store.
The other main service provider offers an international service on its Japanese CDMA phones that allows the phone to be used on the CDMA networks in Korea, Guam, Saipan, Thailand, China, Hong Kong, America, Australia, New Zealand and Canada.
Cell phones use a specific range of radio frequencies.
4 GHz CDP lets consumers chat on the phone using a Bluetooth headset while wirelessly surfing the Internet or accessing email on a laptop anywhere in the home--all from a single cordless data phone.
All donated cell phones are to be accompanied by a battery and recharger, and security codes are to be disarmed.
The report says that the average cell phone is typically used for 18 months before being replaced; by 2005 about 130 million phones will be retired annually in the U.
Traffic accidents caused by distracted drivers on cell phones have become so common that local and state governments have begun passing laws banning the use of handheld telephones while driving.
The WTR study showed a correlation between a higher incidence of brain cancer and a greater risk of rare neurological tumors and DNA damage among the users of handheld phones versus users of other types of phones.
In the first 5 months of 1996, thieves in Jacksonville stole over 300 hand-held cellular phones and cloned even more.