phoneme

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phoneme

 [fo´nēm]
the smallest distinct unit of sound in speech; the basic unit of spoken language.

pho·neme

(fō'nēm),
A speech sound.
[G. phōnēma, a voice]

pho·neme

(fō'nēm)
The smallest sound unit that, in terms of the phonetic sequences of sound, controls meaning.
[G. phōnēma, a voice]

phoneme

One of the many sounds in speech that distinguish the meaning of one word from another, as in the case of ‘b’ and ‘w’ which distinguish, for instance, ‘bed’ and ‘wed’ in English.

pho·neme

(fō'nēm)
The smallest sound unit that, in terms of the phonetic sequences of sound, controls meaning.
[G. phōnēma, a voice]

phoneme (fō´nēm),

n a group or family of closely related speech sounds, all of which have the same distinctive acoustic characteristics despite their differences; often used in place of the term
speech sound.
References in periodicals archive ?
If phonemics dictates word recognition, prosody then serves to convey the intended message.
In recent years, the focus in ESL/EFL pronunciation teaching in appears to have shifted from phonemics to a more balanced allocation of importance to both phonemics and prosody (Hardison, 2004).
Before prosody became an emphasis in ESL/EFL pronunciation teaching, researchers had generally agreed that it was more crucial than phonemics in overall speech intelligibility.
So far, most discussions about the possibly uneven importance of phonemics and prosody in non-native speech intelligibility have occurred in TESL studies.
Although the study did register the different roles that phonemics and prosody played in ST, it was not meant to address the issue of 'phonemics vs.
Given the lack of empirical evidence, the issue of non-native ST needs to be further investigated with regard to phonemics and prosody in the interpreting context in order to determine which component plays a more important role in interpreters' comprehension.
Participants' renditions were rated numerically according to their accuracy, after which the data were entered into a computer for quantitative analysis in order to analyse the impact of non-native phonemics and prosody on the participants' rendition accuracy.
To make sure that phonemics and prosody were the only independent variables and that both speech rate and speaker's voice quality were under control, the four versions were recorded at around 120 words per minute by the same speaker, a twenty-five-year-old non-native female capable of manipulating her speech according to specifications.
unfamiliar words and expressions, structural complexity, phonemics, and prosody) to identify possible roots of the problem.
1 Impacts of non-native phonemics and prosody on rendition accuracy
The theory which we are defending is much more constrained, since it requires the interaction of phonology and versification to take place at the classical phonemic level.
We know of very many poetic traditions which make use of phonemic distinctions, whereas there is only a small number of cases where a poetic tradition has been claimed make use of deeper, more abstract distinctions.