phoneme

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phoneme

 [fo´nēm]
the smallest distinct unit of sound in speech; the basic unit of spoken language.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pho·neme

(fō'nēm),
A speech sound.
[G. phōnēma, a voice]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pho·neme

(fō'nēm)
The smallest sound unit that, in terms of the phonetic sequences of sound, controls meaning.
[G. phōnēma, a voice]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

phoneme

One of the many sounds in speech that distinguish the meaning of one word from another, as in the case of ‘b’ and ‘w’ which distinguish, for instance, ‘bed’ and ‘wed’ in English.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

pho·neme

(fō'nēm)
The smallest sound unit that, in terms of the phonetic sequences of sound, controls meaning.
[G. phōnēma, a voice]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Although both phonemics and prosody play a part in an accent, disagreements exist concerning which of the two impedes speech intelligibility more (Anderson-Hsieh et al., 1992).
(4.) Tohono O'odham words are written in a phonemic transcription using IPA symbols; [[??]] is a postalveolar lateral flap, [d] and [s] are apicoalveolar, [n] is a palatal nasal, and vowel length is indicated with a [[??]].
All the works that make up a genre are texts, of course; the real world is no more present than it is in phonemics, semantics or stylistics.
Chapters 1 and 2 present the whole language and decoding approaches respectively while chapters 2, 4, 5 and 6 provide an extensive coverage of phonemics and phonics.
Mental imagery, phonemics and word length are also important factors to consider in test translation as they can influence the degree of recall.
The argument is risky on phonetic grounds since orthography hardly mirrors phonetics and often only approximates phonemics. This is particularly so for transcriptions of one language into another, each with its own phonetics and phoneme set.
The implication is, of course, that such criteria play no part, or at least need not play one, in the theoretical foundation of phonemics. ...