phocomelia


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

phocomelia

 [fo″ko-me´le-ah]
congenital absence of the proximal portion of a limb or limbs, the hands or feet being attached to the trunk by a small, irregularly shaped bone. adj., adj phocome´lic.

pho·co·me·li·a

, phocomely (fō'kō-mē'lē-ă, fō-kom'ĕ-lē),
A type of meromelia; defective development of arms or legs, or both, so that the hands and feet are attached close to the body, resembling the flippers of a seal.
[G. phōkē, a seal, + melos, extremity]

phocomelia

/pho·co·me·lia/ (fo″kah-me´le-ah) congenital absence of the proximal portion of a limb or limbs, the hands or feet being attached to the trunk by a small, irregularly shaped bone.phocome´lic

phocomelia

(fō′kō-mē′lē-ə, -mēl′yə)
n.
A birth defect in which the upper portion of a limb is absent or poorly developed, so that the hand or foot attaches to the body by a short, flipperlike stump.

phocomelia

[fō′kəmē′lyə]
Etymology: Gk, phoke, seal, melos, limb
a developmental anomaly characterized by absence of the upper part of one or more of the limbs so that the feet or hands or both are attached to the trunk of the body by short, irregularly shaped stumps, resembling the fins of a seal. The condition, caused by interference with the embryonic development of the long bones, is rare and is seen primarily as a side effect of the drug thalidomide taken during early pregnancy. Also called seal limbs. Compare amelia. phocomelic, adj.
enlarge picture
Phocomelia of the left upper limb

phocomelia

Teratology A congenital malformation characterized by attachment of a hand to the shoulder or foot to the pelvis, imparting a seal flipper appearance, classically associated with exposure of a developing fetus to thalidomide. See Thalidomide.

pho·co·me·li·a

, phocomely (fō'kō-mē'lē-ă, fō-kom'ĕ-lē)
Defective development of the upper or lower limbs, or both, so that the hands and feet are attached close to the body, resembling the flippers of a seal.
[G. phōkē, a seal, + melos, extremity]

phocomelia

A major, congenital limb defect featuring absence of all long bones so that the hands or feet are attached directly to the trunk and resemble flippers. Spontaneous cases of phocomelia are rare but the condition occurred in many children whose mothers were given thalidomide early in their pregnancy.

phocomelia

markedly defective development of either/both arms and legs, with hands and/or feet attached to the trunk; noted in 1960s (due to maternal medication with thalidomide early in pregnancy), and again in the 2000s (in some Third-World countries where mothers, who are unaware of their pregnancy take thalidomide to reduce progress of Hansen's disease)

phocomelia

congenital absence of the proximal portion of a limb or limbs, the distal parts being attached to the trunk by a small, irregularly shaped bone.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ms Lapper, who was born with a condition called phocomelia, will be sharing her own experiences and her views on disability at the conference, called Taking the Pulse.
After seeing an old picture of performer Stanley Berant, who was also born with phocomelia which means to have `seal-like' arms, Mat decides to retrace his fame all the way across to America.
A study of the German outbreak of phocomelia and errors-in-variables in environmental epidemiology.
Phocomelia of the left hand and other special needs
Lapper, who was born without arms and shortened legs due to a medical condition known as phocomelia, has made many influential contributions to the art world, challenging society's preconceptions on motherhood and disability.
In addition one retrospective study showed that when thalidomide exposure occurred between gestation days 20 and 24 (week 3), approximately 30% of the phocomelia cases were also autistic (Miller and Strtmland 1993).
She was born with phocomelia, a congenital condition similar to that caused by Thalidomide, and was sent away by her mother when she was six weeks old.
In 1961 a sudden increase in the frequency of limb reduction defects, phocomelia in particular, in West Germany and Australia was shown to have been caused by maternal prenatal use of the sedative-hypnotic thalidomide (Lenz 1962; McBride 1961; Taussig 1962).