distemper

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distemper

 [dis-tem´per]
a name for several infectious diseases of animals, especially canine distemper, a highly fatal viral disease of dogs, marked by fever, loss of appetite, and a discharge from the nose and eyes.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

distemper

(dĭs-tĕm′pər)
n.
1. Any of various infectious diseases of animals, especially:
2. An illness or disease; an ailment: "He died ... of a broken heart, a distemper which kills many more than is generally imagined" (Henry Fielding).
3. Ill humor; testiness.
4. Disorder or disturbance, especially of a social or political nature.
tr.v. distem·pered, distem·pering, distem·pers
1. To put out of order.
2. Archaic To unsettle; derange.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

dis·tem·per

(dis-tem'pĕr)
The colloquial usage for canine distemper caused by an RNA virus of the genus Morbillivirus, a member of the family Paramyxoviridae.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The 1988 and 2002 phocine distemper virus epidemics in European harbor seals.
Genetic diversity and phylogenetic analysis of the attachment glycoprotein of phocine distemper viruses of the 2002 and 1988 epizootics.
Phocine distemper in harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) from Long Island, New York.
Identification and real-time PCR quantification of phocine distemper virus from two colonies of Scottish grey seals in 2002.
Phocine distemper virus (PDV) infection (1-3) was considered responsible for the deaths of [approximately equal to] 18,000 seals in Europe in the first recorded outbreak in 1988 (4), and of [approximately equal to] 22,000 seals in the second outbreak in 2002 (5,6).
transmission studies of cell culture-propagated phocine distemper virus in harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) and a grey seal (Halichoerus grypus): clinical, virological and serological results.
The descriptive epizootiology of phocine distemper in the UK during 1988/89.
Phocine distemper virus 1 (PDV-1) and CDV represent two distinct but antigenetically and genetically related morbilliviruses (5).
Persistence thresholds for phocine distemper virus infection in harbour seal Phoca vitulina metapopulations.
A monoclonal antibody against the nucleoprotein of phocine distemper virus, known to cross-react with canine distemper virus and cetacean morbilliviruses, was used as primary antibody.
The resulting sequences matched those of canine distemper virus and were clearly distinct from those of other members of the genus Morbillivirus, including phocine distemper virus.