potion

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po·tion

(pō'shŭn),
A draft or large dose of liquid medicine.
[L. potio, fr. poto, to drink]

potion

(pō′shən)
n.
A liquid or liquid mixture, especially one that is medicinal, poisonous, or magical.

po·tion

(pō'shŭn)
A draft or large dose of liquid medicine.
[L. potio, fr. poto, to drink]

po·tion

(pō'shŭn)
A draft or large dose of liquid medicine.
[L. potio, fr. poto, to drink]
References in periodicals archive ?
Our Philter products eliminate the smoke and smell, the two most common complaints of this issue.
Tristan Vox's radiophonic voice gives a filtered version of Felix Robinet, and it functions as invisibly as a philter. Vox qua voice filters into the auditors' ears, creating a seductive auditory image of the absent speaking subject.
(34) Ibid., 191: "As for me, I believe that these philters correspond nowadays to the profit accumulated through immoderate greed, to the wages of ambition, as well as to the excessive, blind extravagance of fortune.
it is certainly predominantly the case that women seem to have access to magical philters created by Morgan [le Fay, and] the link between [female] magic and power over an individual is tied in many ways to the link between control over female sexuality" (Sweeney 2000: 27).
(11) Mary Frances Wack, "From Mental Faculties to Magical Philters: The Entry of Magic into Academic Medical Writing on Lovesickness, 13-17th Centuries," Eros and Anteros; The Medical Traditions of Love in the Renaissance, ed.
Besides, in a story whose narrative thread is spun by one Madame Longstaffe (of genuine psychic powers, magic cockroaches, and working love philters), verisimilitude is probably as out of place as an anorexic in a Botero painting.
It connotes potions and philters. The coconut was said to detect poison, the sixteenth century's agent of terrorism.