philosophy

(redirected from philosophize)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to philosophize: philosophise

philosophy

 [fĭ-los´ŏ-fe]
a system of beliefs and principles.
concordant philosophy a philosophical system used in kinlein, concerned with the practical aspects of a person on a day to day basis; a central principle is that of cordising. See also esca.

philosophy

(fĭ-lŏs′ō-fē)
1. The love or pursuit of knowledge.
2. A culturally determined system of beliefs, concepts, theories, or convictions.
References in periodicals archive ?
For those capable of so doing, there is a duty to philosophize.
Or, Yudell philosophizes, "Do we have to have [an environmental health] disaster first?
It's better to take a hike, where you make discoveries, than to drive on the freeway," he philosophizes.
He philosophizes about being an alien both in Greece and in Sweden, "the land of the Hyperborean" whose heathen gods are foreign to him.
Here we have a photographer who keeps a visual diary, one who lets himself be caught up in unforeseeable events, one who philosophizes about "das Nichts" ("nothingness") with images of crusted snow or finds still lifes in random objects glimpsed on tables and window sills.
A human being philosophizes because he or she is an exister and therefore a discloser of possible experiences (p.
In a scene in which Ike philosophizes about losing one's humanity, Selleck's chiseled, virtually impassive face betrays no suggestion that humanity is anything more than a theoretical construct.
George, weighing his options between venturing out into the big wide world for new adventures and remaining in town with Emily, philosophizes, ``New people probably aren't any better than old ones.
Lizzie philosophizes that the trip represents her ``chance to start over'' - start what over?
When he addresses the failed Bay of Pigs fiasco with an angry, ``How could I have been so stupid,'' reflects on his humiliation by Khruschev at the 1961 Vienna summit meeting or casually philosophizes on the Kennedy history of womanizing, Shannon's JFK is merely providing information without illumination.