philosophy

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philosophy

 [fĭ-los´ŏ-fe]
a system of beliefs and principles.
concordant philosophy a philosophical system used in kinlein, concerned with the practical aspects of a person on a day to day basis; a central principle is that of cordising. See also esca.

philosophy

(fĭ-lŏs′ō-fē)
1. The love or pursuit of knowledge.
2. A culturally determined system of beliefs, concepts, theories, or convictions.
References in classic literature ?
Melville's absorption in philosophical studies was quite as responsible as the failure of his later books for his cessation from literary productiveness.
Another criterion of the philosophical nature has also to be considered.
Then you will soon observe whether a man is just and gentle, or rude and unsociable; these are the signs which distinguish even in youth the philosophical nature from the unphilosophical.
That would be enough to get over any philosophical hopes.
I respect your philosophical scepticism, Razumov, but don't touch the soul.
The three friends shook their heads at each other; saying by that action, without the trouble of opening their lips, 'Do you observe what a philosophical mind our friend has?
Even the two players at dominoes glanced up from their game, as if to protest against philosophical philanthropy being brought by name into the Break of Day.
If your philosophical philanthropy,' said the landlady, putting down her work, and rising to take the stranger's soup from her husband, who appeared with it at a side door, 'puts anybody at the mercy of such people by holding terms with them at all, in words or deeds, or both, take it away from the Break of Day, for it isn't worth a sou.
Brownlow's heart, being large enough for any six ordinary old gentlemen of humane disposition, forced a supply of tears into his eyes, by some hydraulic process which we are not sufficiently philosophical to be in a condition to explain.
If I wanted any further proof of the strictly philosophical nature of the conduct of these young gentlemen in their very delicate predicament, I should at once find it in the fact (also recorded in a foregoing part of this narrative), of their quitting the pursuit, when the general attention was fixed upon Oliver; and making immediately for their home by the shortest possible cut.
Having arrived at this comfortable frame of mind (to which she had been greatly assisted by certain short interjectional remarks of the philosophical George), Mrs Jarley consoled Nell with many kind words, and requested as a personal favour that whenever she thought of Miss Monflathers, she would do nothing else but laugh at her, all the days of her life.
THE CAMBRIDGE COMPANION TO CHRISTIAN PHILOSOPHICAL THEOLOGY.