philosophy

(redirected from philosophical)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

philosophy

 [fĭ-los´ŏ-fe]
a system of beliefs and principles.
concordant philosophy a philosophical system used in kinlein, concerned with the practical aspects of a person on a day to day basis; a central principle is that of cordising. See also esca.

philosophy

(fĭ-lŏs′ō-fē)
1. The love or pursuit of knowledge.
2. A culturally determined system of beliefs, concepts, theories, or convictions.
References in periodicals archive ?
This volume consists of nine essays drawn from two symposia of the American Philosophical Society held in April 1987 on the life and times of the constitutional framers and problems connected to the interpretation of the US Constitution in today's world.
West, as well as the role of Islamic philosophical thought in revising
Hegel is well known for saying that a philosophical conceptualization of the religious representation alters the form but not the content of the latter.
The focus is to discover a major contribution of classical Central Asian philosophy of the IX-XII centuries to further development of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance philosophical thought of Europe (Hoerz, 1986; Gow, 2016).
Throughout modern history, the philosophical imagination has created the philosophical perspectives of modern materialism, rationalism, empiricism, phenomenalism, historicism, existentialism, pragmatism, hermeneutics, and feminism.
So do political beliefs fall within the category of philosophical belief?
Various events and activities include: Philosophical dialogues, debates, lectures, and meetings involving renowned philosophers.
Each part features both theological and philosophical perspectives on particular areas of life experience.
Regarding philosophy, the methodological view that philosophical questions cannot be answered through scientific experimentation has a negative and a positive version.
RECENTLY A QUITE DIFFERENT INTERPRETATION of the Commentary on the Nicomachean Ethics has been advanced: Aquinas did not mislead, on purpose or by accident, but showed his students how his own larger philosophical arguments interlocked with Aristotle's, extending the Philosopher's arguments where questions were left unanswered.
According to Somers-Hall, both Deleuze and Hegel begin their philosophical inquiries from the problem of finite representation in Kant's Critique of Pure Reason.