pheromone

(redirected from pheromonal)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

pheromone

 [fer´o-mōn]
a substance secreted to the outside of the body and perceived (as by smell) by other individuals of the same species, releasing specific behavior in the percipient.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pher·o·mone

(fer'ō-mōn),
A type of ectohormone secreted by an individual and perceived by a second individual of the same or similar species, thereby producing a change in the sexual or social behavior of that individual. Compare: allelochemicals, allomone, kairomone.
[G. pherō, to carry, + hormaō, to excite, stimulate]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pheromone

(fĕr′ə-mōn′)
n.
A chemical secreted by an animal, especially an insect, that influences the behavior or physiology of others of the same species, as by attracting members of the opposite sex or marking the route to a food source.

pher′o·mon′al adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

pheromone

A secreted or excreted chemical factor that triggers a social response in members of the same species, which fall into one of three broad categories:  alarm pheromones, food trail pheromones, and sex pheromones.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

pheromone

An odorous body secretion that affects the behaviour of other individuals of the same species, acting as a sex attractant or in other ways. Pheromones are important in many animal species but, until recently, were thought to be unimportant in humans. It has now been shown, however, that the timing of ovulation in women can be controlled by pheromones from the armpit. This is believed to be the explanation of the fact that women living together will frequently develop synchronized menstrual cycles.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

pheromone

a chemical substance used in communication between organisms of the same species. Pheromones are found mainly in animals, but they occur in some lower plant groups where a chemical is secreted into water by female gametes to attract male gametes. In animals, for example, pheromones are transmitted in the air, as in female emperor and eggar moths, which secrete a chemical that is attractive to males over large distances, or by a dog marking out his territory with urine. Insect pheromones have been used to trap females of serious pests.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1973 when I began the synthesis of (S)-2, almost nothing was known about the absolute configuration of chiral and non-racemic pheromones, and it was not even clear whether enantiomeric composition would play a role at all in pheromonal communications.
Hormonal pattern of the pheromonal restoration of cyclic activity in aging irregularly cycling and persistent estrus female rats.
We conducted three studies using nutrient-enriched agar to investigate pheromonal control of gender expression in gametophytes of the fern Osmunda cinnamomea.
Sublethal effects of a carbamate pesticide on pheromonal mediated endocrine function in mature male Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L) parr.
Pheromonal differences may provide the basis for species recognition and avoidance of interspecific mating (Cooper & Vitt 1984, Higgie et al.
Specifically, in rodents, reproductively relevant pheromonal cues are detected by receptors in the vomeronasal organ, which in turn transmit this information centrally via the accessory olfactory bulb, the medial nucleus of the amygdala, the posterior medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the medial preoptic area.
Pheromonal influences on sociosexual behavior in young women.
When they changed pheromone profiles so that females "tasted" like males, the researchers found that males would attack them - showing that pheromonal cues alone could label another fly as a competitor.
It is believed that the lower scrape-making and tending by subordinate bucks is related to a phenomenon known as pheromonal suppression.
However, some research also suggests different species of fish in the same family--such as different types of minnows--can interpret and react to each other's pheromonal memorandums.
"Part of the argument for using the CQ is that people are often sucked into relationships for reasons, whether chemical or pheromonal, that only later they'll discover are superficial.