pheresis


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Related to pheresis: phoresis

apheresis

 [af″ĕ-re´sis]
any procedure in which blood is withdrawn from a donor, a portion (such as plasma, leukocytes, or platelets) is separated and retained, and the remainder is retransfused into the donor. Types include erythrocytapheresis, leukapheresis, lymphocytapheresis, plasmapheresis, and plateletpheresis.. Called also hemapheresis and pheresis.
therapeutic apheresis separation of whole blood into its major components and removal of the abnormal, pathogenic component. Types include plasma exchange (plasmapheresis), removal of white blood cells (leukapheresis), removal of platelets (thrombocytapheresis), and removal of red blood cells erythrocytapheresis). The process is currently used as measure of last resort when conventional therapies are unsuccessful in controlling a chronic, debilitating, or potentially fatal disease. Its primary purpose is to modify the pathologic process so that other treatments can be more effective. It is not a cure. Plasmapheresis may be used in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and some malignancies, in which plasma constituents can interfere with the function of the immune system. Other diseases for which therapeutic apheresis might be used include certain blood dyscrasias such as thrombocytosis, polycythemia vera, and sickle cell anemia.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

phe·re·sis

(fe-rē'sis), See note at apheresis. Do not confuse this word with phoresis.
A procedure in which blood is removed from a donor, separated, and a portion retained, the remainder is returned to the donor.
See also: leukapheresis, plateletapheresis, plasmapheresis.
[G. aphairesis, a taking away, a withdrawal]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pheresis

(fə-rē′sĭs, fĕr′ə-)
n. Informal
Apheresis.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

apheresis

The removal of whole blood from a patient or donor followed by separation into its components, some of which is discarded, with the rest being returned to the patient.

Therapeutic indications 
• Leukocytes in hyperleukemic leukostasis with > 100 x 109/L blasts; 
• Platelets in thrombocytosis with > 1000 x 109/L platelets, if symptomatic; 
• Defective RBCs, replacing them with normal RBCs, as in sickle cell anaemia with crisis; 
• Immunoglobulins causing hyperviscosity syndrome in macroglobulinaemia/myeloma; 
• Autoantibody production in myasthenia gravis, Goodpasture syndrome, SLE, factor VIII antibodies; and 
• Lipoproteins in patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

pheresis

See Cytapheresis, Plasmapheresis, Plateletpheresis.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

phe·re·sis

(fĕ-rē'sis)
A procedure in which blood is removed from a donor, separated, and a portion retained, with the remainder returned to the donor.
See also: leukapheresis, plateletpheresis, plasmapheresis
[G. aphairesis, a taking away, a withdrawal]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

a·pher·e·sis

, pheresis (ăfĕr-ēsis, fĕr-ēsis)
Infusion of a patient's own blood from which elements (e.g., plasma, leukocytes, or platelets) have been removed.
[G. aphairesis, withdrawal]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
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The nurse starting up my next pheresis treatment arrived after
A lot can go wrong during plasma pheresis. An incorrectly placed
During pheresis, a patient's blood pressure can drop precipitously.
In November 1983, Charlotte again returned to Mayo, her skin blistered from a reaction to the D-penicillamine and her itching more persistent than ever because she had weaned herself from the pheresis machine.
Perseghin, Capra, Pheresis performed Changes in systolic BP Baldini, & Sciorelli with Autopheresis C for ACE group (2001) device significant (p < 0.0001) Bradykinin assay Bradykinin performed with determination electrophoresis significantly higher instrument in ACE group for first (Cosmofer[R] 3200) cycle and post-values and statistical (p < 0.0001) when analysis compared to control performed using group.
Today, MIMA's monthly transfusion average is 150 leukoreduced RBCs, 15 platelet pheresis units, and two to four fresh-frozen plasmas.
We provide approximately 4,000 red blood cell units, 2,000 random and pheresis platelet units, and 1,700 fresh-frozen plasma units to our patients every year.
Pheresis donors are highly committed and may have undergone histocompatibility testing for matching with a specific patient.
* Clinical issues relevant to nephrology nursing practice including hemodialysis (acute and chronic), peritoneal dialysis, transplantation, CVVH, pheresis, and pre-ESRD/conservative management.
The pheresis nurse would find the chapters on the Immune System, Plasma, and Apheresis to be a valuable resource.