pheresis


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Related to pheresis: phoresis

apheresis

 [af″ĕ-re´sis]
any procedure in which blood is withdrawn from a donor, a portion (such as plasma, leukocytes, or platelets) is separated and retained, and the remainder is retransfused into the donor. Types include erythrocytapheresis, leukapheresis, lymphocytapheresis, plasmapheresis, and plateletpheresis.. Called also hemapheresis and pheresis.
therapeutic apheresis separation of whole blood into its major components and removal of the abnormal, pathogenic component. Types include plasma exchange (plasmapheresis), removal of white blood cells (leukapheresis), removal of platelets (thrombocytapheresis), and removal of red blood cells erythrocytapheresis). The process is currently used as measure of last resort when conventional therapies are unsuccessful in controlling a chronic, debilitating, or potentially fatal disease. Its primary purpose is to modify the pathologic process so that other treatments can be more effective. It is not a cure. Plasmapheresis may be used in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and some malignancies, in which plasma constituents can interfere with the function of the immune system. Other diseases for which therapeutic apheresis might be used include certain blood dyscrasias such as thrombocytosis, polycythemia vera, and sickle cell anemia.

phe·re·sis

(fe-rē'sis), See note at apheresis. Do not confuse this word with phoresis.
A procedure in which blood is removed from a donor, separated, and a portion retained, the remainder is returned to the donor.
See also: leukapheresis, plateletapheresis, plasmapheresis.
[G. aphairesis, a taking away, a withdrawal]

pheresis

/phe·re·sis/ (fĕ-re´sis) apheresis.

pheresis

(fə-rē′sĭs, fĕr′ə-)
n. Informal
Apheresis.

pheresis

See apheresis.

apheresis

The removal of whole blood from a patient or donor followed by separation into its components, some of which is discarded, with the rest being returned to the patient.

Therapeutic indications 
• Leukocytes in hyperleukemic leukostasis with > 100 x 109/L blasts; 
• Platelets in thrombocytosis with > 1000 x 109/L platelets, if symptomatic; 
• Defective RBCs, replacing them with normal RBCs, as in sickle cell anaemia with crisis; 
• Immunoglobulins causing hyperviscosity syndrome in macroglobulinaemia/myeloma; 
• Autoantibody production in myasthenia gravis, Goodpasture syndrome, SLE, factor VIII antibodies; and 
• Lipoproteins in patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia.

pheresis

See Cytapheresis, Plasmapheresis, Plateletpheresis.

phe·re·sis

(fĕ-rē'sis)
A procedure in which blood is removed from a donor, separated, and a portion retained, with the remainder returned to the donor.
See also: leukapheresis, plateletpheresis, plasmapheresis
[G. aphairesis, a taking away, a withdrawal]

a·pher·e·sis

, pheresis (ăfĕr-ēsis, fĕr-ēsis)
Infusion of a patient's own blood from which elements (e.g., plasma, leukocytes, or platelets) have been removed.
[G. aphairesis, withdrawal]

pheresis

any procedure in which blood is withdrawn from a donor, a portion (plasma, leukocytes, etc.) is separated and retained, and the remainder is retransfused into the donor. It includes plasmapheresis, leukapheresis, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The nurse starting up my next pheresis treatment arrived after
The Red Cross does a very good job of scheduling the plasma pheresis appointments.
Platelets are donated through a unique process called pheresis (fur-ee-sis).
Pheresis donors are highly committed and may have undergone histocompatibility testing for matching with a specific patient.
WHAT: The Power of Giving -- A Tribute to the Area's Super Blood Donors -- Pheresis Donors WHY: It takes a very special person to drop his or her plans on 24 hours or less notice in order to spend 2 1/2 hours with needles in both arms donating infection-fighting white blood cells or platelets to keep a total stranger alive.
Clinical issues relevant to nephrology nursing practice including hemodialysis (acute and chronic), peritoneal dialysis, transplantation, CVVH, pheresis, and pre-ESRD/conservative management.
Platelet pheresis donors, who help cancer patients, are also urgently needed.
The pheresis nurse would find the chapters on the Immune System, Plasma, and Apheresis to be a valuable resource.
The parties' dispute concerned contracts entered into in the early 1990s for the provision of pheresis equipment used in Red Cross blood centers.
The add-on module uses a novel new push-pull pheresis technique to extract large volumes of plasma which are treated by hepatocytes and returned to the patient.
Located at Alta Bates' Herrick Campus, the new outpatient facility is designed to offer a full range of diagnostic and therapeutic cancer services, including radiation therapy, chemotherapy, pheresis, bone marrow transplantation, and outpatient surgery, as well as psychological counseling and social services.