phenylalanine


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Related to phenylalanine: Phenylalanine hydroxylase

phenylalanine

 [fen″il-al´ah-nīn]
a naturally occurring amino acid, one of the essential amino acids, necessary for optimal growth in infants and for nitrogen equilibrium in adults.

phen·yl·al·a·nine (Phe, F),

(fen'il-al'ă-nēn),
2-Amino-3-phenylpropionic acid; the l-isomer is one of the common amino acids in proteins; a nutritionally essential amino acid.

phenylalanine

(fĕn′əl-ăl′ə-nēn′, fē′nəl-)
n.
An essential amino acid, C9H11NO2, that occurs as a constituent of many proteins and is converted to tyrosine in the body.

phenylalanine

Alternative pharmacology
A 50:50 mixture of dextro- and levo-forms of the amino acid phenylalanine, which is present in meats and cheeses. Phenylalanine is claimed to reverse ageing by boosting the internal supply of norepinephrine, and is allegedly useful for fatigue, depression, pain and other age-related phenomena. There is no peer-reviewed scientific evidence to support its alleged effects and benefits.

phen·yl·al·a·nine

(fen'il-al'ă-nēn)
One of the common amino acids in proteins; a nutritionally essential amino acid.

phenylalanine

One of the 20 AMINO ACIDS from which proteins are constructed. Phenylalanine is an essential amino acid and cannot be synthesized in the body; it must be provided in the diet.
Phenylananineclick for a larger image
Fig. 251 Phenylananine . Molecular structure.

phenylalanine (F, Phe)

one of 20 AMINO ACIDS common in proteins, which has a NONPOLAR'R’ structure and is relatively insoluble in water.

The ISOELECTRIC POINT of phenylalanine is 5.5.see PHENYLKETONURIA.

Phenylalanine

An essential amino acid that must be obtained from food since the human body cannot manufacture it.
Mentioned in: Phenylketonuria

phen·yl·al·a·nine

(F) (fen'il-al'ă-nēn)
One of the common amino acids in proteins; a nutritionally essential amino acid.
References in periodicals archive ?
Drugs have recently become available that can drive down levels of phenylalanine. But they only work in a fraction of patients, and they come with side effects of their own.
It was reported that aspartic acid has a toxic effect on dermatophytes.23 Such reports have also been published for glutamine and tyrosine.23-27 Bakhshi et al.28 reported that the concentration of glutamates, asparagine, histidine, glutamine, arginine, citrulline, threonine, phenylalanine, and isoleucine are high in patients suspected to dermatophytes compared to healthy individuals.
The optimal phenylalanine requirement of juvenile shrimp was determined using weight gain rate (WGR), feed conversion ratio (FCR), and body protein deposition (BPD) by using a polynomial regression method (Zeitoun et al.
According to Eggerding, patients with PKU must follow a strict diet that is low in phenylalanine and consequently, low in protein for their whole lives.
Nitric oxide synthesis dysregulation and tetrahydrobiopterin depletion were probably related to impaired conversion of phenylalanine to tyrosine and the accumulation of phenylalanine [14, 15].
Phenylalanine is an amino acid produced in the gut when protein is digested and has previously been shown to affect the release of gut hormones that reduce appetite in rodents.
After the analyses are carried out, only children that have a phenylalanine concentration above the allowed limit repeat analyses.
Brain phenylalanine concentrations in phenylketonuria: research and treatment of adults.
Dysfunction or the complete loss of function in the PAH enzyme would cause disturbances in the metabolism of the essential amino acid, phenylalanine, which would in turn cause the Phenylketonuria (PKU) disease (4).
The treatment is a low-protein diet supplemented with artificial protein which contains no phenylalanine.
With [absolute value of [P.sub.corr]] values > 0.60207 (for degree of freedom = 9) and VIP values > 1, the urine samples of the MS group compared to those of the NS group showed upregulation of leucine, lactate, alanine, dimethylamine, phenylacetylglycine, hippurate, allantoin, cytidine, tyrosine, imidazole, and phenylalanine and downregulation of acetate, N-acetylglutamate, succinate, 2-oxoglutarate, citrate, and trimethylamine (Table 1).
Some enzymes of this metabolic pathway, such as phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), tyrosine ammonia-lyase (TAL), and peroxidase (POD), are associated with the synthesis and polymerization of monolignols and, consequently, with premature lignification [17, 18].

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