phenotype

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phenotype

 [fe´no-tīp]
1. the outward, visible expression of the hereditary constitution of an organism.
2. an individual exhibiting a certain phenotype; a trait expressed in a phenotype. adj., adj phenotyp´ic.

phe·no·type

(fē'nō-tīp),
The observable characteristics, at the physical, morphologic, or biochemical level, of an individual, as determined by the genotype and environment.
[G. phainō, to display, + typos, model]

phenotype

/phe·no·type/ (fe´nah-tīp) the entire physical, biochemical, and physiological makeup of an individual as determined both genetically and environmentally. Also, any one or any group of such traits.phenotyp´ic

phenotype

(fē′nə-tīp′)
n.
1.
a. The observable physical or biochemical characteristics of an organism, as determined by both genetic makeup and environmental influences.
b. The expression of a specific trait, such as stature or blood type, based on genetic and environmental influences.
2. An individual or group of organisms exhibiting a particular phenotype.

phe′no·typ′ic (-tĭp′ĭk), phe′no·typ′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
phe′no·typ′i·cal·ly adv.

phenotype

[fē′nətīp]
Etymology: Gk, phainein, to appear, typos, mark
1 the complete observable characteristics of an organism or group, including anatomical, physiological, biochemical, and behavioral traits, as determined by the interaction of genetic makeup and environmental factors.
2 a group of organisms that resemble each other in appearance. Compare genotype. phenotypic, adj.

phenotype

Genetics
1. Any observable or identifiable structural or functional characteristic of an organism.
2. The sum of the structural/physical and functional–biochemical, and physiologic characteristics of an organism, defined by genetics, modified by the environment. See Bombay phenotype, Mutation, Null phenotype, Para-Bombay phenotype, Swarmer cell phenotype, Trait. Cf Genotype.

phe·no·type

(fē'nō-tīp)
Manifestation of a genotype or the combined manifestation of several different genotypes. The discriminating power of the phenotype in identifying the genotype depends on its level of subtlety; thus, special methods of detecting carriers distinguish them from normal subjects from whom they are inseparable on simple physical examination. Phenotype is the immediate cause of genetic disease and object of genetic selection.
[G. phainō, to display, + typos, model]

phenotype

1. The observable appearance of an organism which is the result of the interaction of its genetic constitution and its subsequent environmental experience.
2. Any identifiable structural or functional feature of an organism. Compare GENOTYPE.

phenotype

the observable features of an individual organism that result from an interaction between the GENOTYPE and the environment in which development occurs. The interaction is that between nature and nurture. Variations due to nature are the inherited aspects of the organism, the genotype, while nurture denotes the (usually not inherited) effects of the environment upon the organism.

Sometimes two different genotypes give the same phenotype due to DOMINANCE (1) masking a recessive ALLELE. It is true to say however, that the closer we look at the effect of an allele the more likely we are to detect a special phenotype unmasked by dominance. For example, an allele may code for a nonfunctional enzyme and thus be hidden in a heterozygote (classifying the allele as recessive) but its effects may be detected by such methods as ELECTROPHORESIS, which can identify different forms of a protein.

Phenotype

1) The entire physical, biochemical, and physiologic makeup of an individual, as opposed to genotype. 2) The expression of a single gene or gene pair.

phenotype

an individual's characteristics, determined largely, but not entirely, by his/her genotype, as it can be influenced for example by environmental and maternal factors.

phenotype 

The observable characteristics (e.g. eye colour, height) of an individual that are the result of an interaction between the genes and the environment. See expressivity; genotype.

phe·no·type

(fē'nō-tīp)
Observable characteristics, at physical, morphologic, or biochemical levels of an individual.
[G. phainō, to display, + typos, model]

phenotype (fē´nōtīp),

n term referring to the expression of genotypes that can be directly distinguished (e.g., by clinical observation of external appearance or serologic tests).

phenotype

1. the outward appearance of the animal in all of its anatomical, physiological and behavioral characteristics as dictated by the genetic and environmental influences in its environment; in contradistinction to genotype in which only the inherited factors are taken into account.
2. an individual exhibiting a certain phenotype; a trait expressed in a phenotype.

Patient discussion about phenotype

Q. Can anyone with experience help me to know what the clinical phenotype of autism is? I am new to the medical field and I have been here for 3 months. Can anyone with experience help me to know what the clinical phenotype of autism is?

A. I welcome you to my favorite choice. This field is really very satisfying while we serve others for their good. Because of the similarities and differences among people with different forms of autism, health care professionals now view autism as having a broader clinical phenotype than was once thought. The expanded phenotype goes beyond the standard definition for autism, to include, as the DSM-IV states, a range of impairments rather than the absolute presence or absence of a certain behavior or symptom (DSM 1994).The DSM-IV uses the terms “pervasive developmental disorder (PDD)” and “autism spectrum disorder (ASD)” to describe five variations of autistic behavior; the International Classification of Disease (ICD), published by the World Health Organization (WHO) , has eight variations of PDD.

More discussions about phenotype
References in periodicals archive ?
In one case, the tumor involved the testis, and in another case, the abdominal ovary of a phenotypically male patient.
In most instances, they will be nothing more than phenotypically normal carriers.
These six PCR negative strains underwent identification using the APISTAPH kit, evidencing that the two isolates, previously and phenotypically, identified as S.
aeruginosa in our study differed markedly both phenotypically and genotypically from those isolated from the internal tubings.
People who are XXY, XXXY, XXXXY, and XXXXXY are known and are phenotypically male, although not always healthy or fertile.
4% were phenotypically resistant by routine culture on solid media.
Concentrations of nicotine in leaves and nectar were phenotypically correlated within N.
No phenotypically vancomycin-resistant E faecalis isolates were recovered from any of the raptors; 3 isolates had intermediate-level susceptibility.
Molecular epidemiology studies have shown that CA-MRSA differ both phenotypically and genotypically from HA-MRSA (Fang et al.
The result is an eluate of freed antibodies that can be tested against phenotypically known RBCs.
Her take on novels such as Midnight Robber is partially supported by Hopkinson's own statement in this issue that "I, while phenotypically and culturally black, also have Scottish, Jewish, South Asian, and possibly Arawak ancestry in my background.