phenomenology


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phenomenology

 [fĕ-nom″ĕ-nol´o-je]
the study of phenomena in their own right rather than inferring causes; in psychiatry, the theory that behavior is determined by the way the person perceives reality rather than by objective external reality.

phe·nom·e·nol·o·gy

(fĕ-nom'ĕ-nol'ŏ-jē),
1. The systematic description and classification of phenomena without attempt at explanation or interpretation.
See also: existential psychology.
2. The study of human experiences, irrespective of objective-subjective distinctions.
See also: existential psychology.
[phenomenon, + G. logos, study]

phenomenology

(fĕ-nŏm″ĕ-nŏl′ō-jē) [Gr. phainomenon, appearing, + logos, word, reason]
1. The study and classification of phenomena.
2. The science of the subjective processes by which phenomena are presented, with emphasis on mental processes and essential elements of experiences. A phenomenological study emphasizes a person's descriptions of and feelings about experienced events.
References in periodicals archive ?
Linda Finlay, author of Phenomenology for therapists: Researching the lived world, is a professional in the field of occupational therapy, psychotherapy and psychology.
Yet Hanich's argument that phenomenology plays a key role in understanding film form and style, emotions, and reception surroundings does not explain why his methodology is critical to understanding horror films and thrillers.
(5) Hopp posits that Husserl insists that the knowledge we acquire through phenomenological reflection possesses a degree of warrant greater than we could attain in the sphere of ordinary empirical objects (for an object to be given in the strictest sense is the ideal of adequate evidence): phenomenology is a science taking place within the limits of mere immediate intuition.
Finally, the therapeutic potential of phenomenology involves resignation from the studies of objective essences, and it considers life as being "in statu nascendi." The latter condition for possibility of therapeutic science corresponds to the focusing on the subjectivity par excellence.
Henry's material phenomenology, in contrast, seeks to rehabilitate and examine the non-intentional elements of consciousness, revealing such moments to be essential components of subjectivity.
The purpose of Queer Phenomenology, Ahmed explains in the introduction, is to pose "the question of'the orientationl of'sexual orientation' as a phenomenological question" (1).
Issues I have with L.'s position recur in his further attempt to base his ethics simply on phenomenology. Does not one who makes a moral judgment profess that what is at issue is the well-being or not of human beings?
Which is not to say that everything breaks down into a mindless relativism or that there is no room left for the discussion of values in phenomenology, but rather that Ihde sees his charge as one of description, one of, perhaps, laying a foundation for how we can later discuss what it means to say that something is good or bad.
In terms of the underpinning theoretic framework, the research utilizes Phenomenology and Symbolic Interactionism as complimentary frameworks.
Tieszen (philosophy, San Jose State U,) makes good use of the ever present link between phenomenology and mathematics in this series of 15 essays, with general topics ranging from Husserl's work on science and logic, Godel's ideas along with those of Quine, Maddy and Penrose, and simple constructive areas of mathematics.
The overlap occurs because Dhavamony discusses identical issues from two different perspectives: the phenomenology of religion in the first part, and Christology in the second part.
The phenomenology of Edmund Husserl had a far greater impact on the Council than Teilhard de Chardin.