phenol

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phenol

 [fe´nol]
1. an extremely poisonous compound, used in dilute solution as an antimicrobial, anesthetic, and antipruritic. Ingestion or absorption through the skin causes symptoms including colic, local irritation, corrosion, seizures, cardiac arrhythmias, shock, and respiratory arrest. Phenol should be properly labeled and stored to avoid accidental poisoning. Called also carbolic acid.
2. any of various related organic compounds containing one or more hydroxyl groups attached to an aromatic carbon ring.
phenol coefficient a measure of the bactericidal activity of a chemical compound in relation to phenol. The activity of the compound is expressed as the ratio of dilution in which it kills in 10 minutes but not in 5 minutes under the specified conditions. It can be determined in the absence of organic matter, or in the presence of a standard amount of added organic matter.

phe·nol

(fē'nol),
Hydroxybenzene; an antiseptic, anesthetic, and disinfectant; locally escharotic in concentrated form and neurolytic in 3-4% solutions; internally, a powerful escharotic poison.

phenol

(fē′nôl′, -nōl′, -nŏl′)
n.
1. A caustic, poisonous, white crystalline compound, C6H6O, derived from benzene and used in resins, plastics, and pharmaceuticals and in dilute form as a disinfectant and antiseptic. Also called carbolic acid.
2. Any of a class of aromatic organic compounds having at least one hydroxyl group attached directly to the benzene ring.

phenol

Nutrition Phenolics A simple cyclic compound with a hydroxyl group on an aromatic ring–eg, tyrosine; phenols are concentrated in fruits–grapes/raisins, garlic, onions, green tea, and may protect against cardiovascular disease, CA, possibly viruses Toxicology Carbolic acid, hydroxybenzene, phenyl hydrate A toxic crystalline compound, with a hydroxyl group on a benzene ring; phenol was once used as a topical anesthetic, antiseptic, and antipruritic

phenol

carbolic acid, C6H5OH, which has been used as an antiseptic and DISINFECTANT because of its antimicrobial activity. However, it irritates the skin and so is rarely used for such purposes nowadays. Derivatives of phenol, called phenolics, contain a molecule of phenol that has been altered chemically to reduce its ability to irritate and/or to increase its antimicrobial activity. Phenolics act by damaging PLASMA MEMBRANES, inactivating ENZYMES and denaturing PROTEINS (see DENATURATION). Phenolics include cresols, which are good surface disinfectants, and hexachlorophene, which is used to control NOSOCOMIAL INFECTIONS.

phe·nol

(fē'nol)
Hydroxybenzene; an antiseptic, anesthetic, and disinfectant.
References in periodicals archive ?
The concentration of water-soluble phenols exceeded 1500 mg/L in both cases.
The efficiency of the CTAB-modified adsorbent on the removal of phenols from the real retort wastewater was studied on two samples at a temperature of 8 [degrees]C by using the batch method.
The first approach is to replace commercial phenol in synthesis of phenolic resins (Chaouch et al.
However, acid hydrolysis cannot be ruled out as a possible mechanism for release of the smoky phenols. Furthermore, it has been shown that upon consumption of smoke-affected wine enzymes in human saliva can also cleave off remaining sugars, causing an unpleasant retro-nasal ash perception.
Our interest in the UV absorption spectra of osubstituted phenols lies in the fact that the proximity of the substituent makes it possible to form intramolecular interactions with the phenol OH group, and it can also form intermolecular hydrogen bonds with the solvent as well as engage in bifurcate interactions.
Considering the above, the purpose of this work is to develop biocapsules made of cellulose acetate for the elimination of phenol. The relevance of the removal of this compound lies in the fact that exposure to phenol levels between 9 and 25 mg [L.sup.-1] causes health problems, due to their toxic, mutagenic, carcinogenic, and teratogenic effects [18].
The success of phenol treatment in pilonidal disease is related to its easy application, low cost, and rapid healing process.
Keywords: Genetic algorithm, Adsorption isotherm, Adsorption of phenol, Adsorption kinetics.
Phenol is included in the group of organic pollutants that are considered hazardous as it can harm organisms including human beings even at very low concentrations (Lin and Wu, 2011).
The lower leaf dry weight as percentage of fresh weight, higher specific leaf area, higher relative growth rate and lower phenol content on B leaves than C leaves could indicate that B plants are geared for a higher productivity rate of resource acquisition than C plants.
Phenol toxicity relates to two main processes--unspecified toxicity related to hydrophobocity of the individual compound and formation of free radicals.