phenology

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phe·nol·o·gy

(fe-nol'ŏ-jē),
The study of the biologic rhythms of plants and animals, particularly those rhythms showing seasonal variation.
[G. phainō, to appear, + logos, study]

phenology

(fĭ-nŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The scientific study of periodic biological phenomena, such as flowering, breeding, and migration, in relation to climatic conditions.
2. The timing of a periodic biological phenomenon in relation to climatic conditions.

phe′no·log′i·cal (fē′nə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
phe′no·log′i·cal·ly adv.
phe·nol′o·gist n.

phenology

(fē-nŏl′ō-jē) [Gr. phainesthai, to appear, + logos, word, reason]
The study of the effects of climate on living things.

phenology

the study of the times of occurrence of periodic biological events in relation to environmental factors.
References in periodicals archive ?
Taking into consideration that phenological cycle of vegetation is an indicator of climate change and rainfall is the most variable element of climate in the study area.
Phenological patterns of Chihuahuan Desert plants in relation to the timing of water availability.
Manipulation of flowering time: phenological integration and maternal effects.
However, predictable phenological events are especially critical for
Phenological changes in vegetation can be identified and time series filtered for external variability (rain, fog, etc.
Effect of three treatments on phenological growth stage of spring maize during 2005, 2006, and 2007 RT, Ridge tillage; NT, no tillage; CT, conventional tillage Treatments Phenological stage Sowing Seedling Silking Harvesting Sujiatun, Liaoning 2005 RT 23 Apr.
That is why the phenological observations are one of the most important evidences in evaluation of influence of climate change upon the vegetation (Chmielewski and Rotzer 2002).
Measuring the phenological variability from satellite imagery.
The study said that an increase in air temperature which is associated with an earlier onset of hop phenological phases had been observed to cause a shortening of the vegetation period.
Two kinds of potential prey (a pest and a non-pest species) were offered in each of four experiments that were repeated in both years, and the density of potential prey (4 per cage) represented approximately the mean pest density (expressed as the number of individuals per linear meter of crop) during the entire phenological soybean period in the field (Gonzalez et al.
Perhaps the most reliable phenological gauge, the best of seasonal calendars, is the night sky.