phenol


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phenol

 [fe´nol]
1. an extremely poisonous compound, used in dilute solution as an antimicrobial, anesthetic, and antipruritic. Ingestion or absorption through the skin causes symptoms including colic, local irritation, corrosion, seizures, cardiac arrhythmias, shock, and respiratory arrest. Phenol should be properly labeled and stored to avoid accidental poisoning. Called also carbolic acid.
2. any of various related organic compounds containing one or more hydroxyl groups attached to an aromatic carbon ring.
phenol coefficient a measure of the bactericidal activity of a chemical compound in relation to phenol. The activity of the compound is expressed as the ratio of dilution in which it kills in 10 minutes but not in 5 minutes under the specified conditions. It can be determined in the absence of organic matter, or in the presence of a standard amount of added organic matter.

phe·nol

(fē'nol),
Hydroxybenzene; an antiseptic, anesthetic, and disinfectant; locally escharotic in concentrated form and neurolytic in 3-4% solutions; internally, a powerful escharotic poison.

phenol

(fē′nôl′, -nōl′, -nŏl′)
n.
1. A caustic, poisonous, white crystalline compound, C6H6O, derived from benzene and used in resins, plastics, and pharmaceuticals and in dilute form as a disinfectant and antiseptic. Also called carbolic acid.
2. Any of a class of aromatic organic compounds having at least one hydroxyl group attached directly to the benzene ring.

phenol

Nutrition Phenolics A simple cyclic compound with a hydroxyl group on an aromatic ring–eg, tyrosine; phenols are concentrated in fruits–grapes/raisins, garlic, onions, green tea, and may protect against cardiovascular disease, CA, possibly viruses Toxicology Carbolic acid, hydroxybenzene, phenyl hydrate A toxic crystalline compound, with a hydroxyl group on a benzene ring; phenol was once used as a topical anesthetic, antiseptic, and antipruritic

phenol

carbolic acid, C6H5OH, which has been used as an antiseptic and DISINFECTANT because of its antimicrobial activity. However, it irritates the skin and so is rarely used for such purposes nowadays. Derivatives of phenol, called phenolics, contain a molecule of phenol that has been altered chemically to reduce its ability to irritate and/or to increase its antimicrobial activity. Phenolics act by damaging PLASMA MEMBRANES, inactivating ENZYMES and denaturing PROTEINS (see DENATURATION). Phenolics include cresols, which are good surface disinfectants, and hexachlorophene, which is used to control NOSOCOMIAL INFECTIONS.

phe·nol

(fē'nol)
Hydroxybenzene; an antiseptic, anesthetic, and disinfectant.
References in periodicals archive ?
Geographically, the global styrenated phenol market is segmented into North America, Asia Pacific, Europe, Middle East & Africa and South America.
Estrogen and phenol red free medium for osteoblast culture: Study of the mineralization ability.
Use of fly ash for the removal of phenol and its analogues from contaminated water.
Control PF resin, with a molar ratio of formaldehyde to phenol (F/P) of 2.0, was synthesized using a conventional procedure with phenol (P) charged once and formaldehyde charged twice ([F.sub.1], and [F.sub.2]; Pocius 2002).
The aim of this study was to determine the safe concentration of effluents containing phenol to the aquatic ecosystems.
Juice from grapes affected by smoke was studied in laboratory analyses to discover what occurred with the volatile phenols.15 The experiments demonstrated that the plant had bound the smoky compounds to grape sugars (see "Uptake and Release of Smoke Taint in Grapevines" on page 61).
To further understand the effect of the o-substituents on the electron distribution in the phenol molecule, we performed NBO analyses on the respective molecules.
where [C.sub.0] is the phenol concentration (mg [L.sup.-1]) in the initial solution, [C.sub.e] is the phenol concentration (mg [L.sup.-1]) in the solution at the end of the adsorption experiment, V is the aqueous solution volume (L), and MWPh is phenol molecular weight.
Cases with recurrent stroke, foot deformity, spasticity grade 4 and less than grade 3, taking anti-spastic drugs, history of allergic reactions to alcohol and phenol, history of previous surgeries or injections and those who were not willing to participate were excluded from the study.
The success of phenol treatment in pilonidal disease is related to its easy application, low cost, and rapid healing process.
The lethal dosage of phenol has been reported to be greater than eight grams (4).