pharmacognosy

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pharmacognosy

 [fahr″mah-kog´no-se]
the branch of pharmacology dealing with natural drugs and their constituents.

phar·ma·cog·no·sy

(far'mă-kog'nō-sē),
A branch of pharmacology concerned with the physical characteristics and botanic and animal sources of crude drugs.
[pharmaco- + G. gnōsis, knowledge]

pharmacognosy

/phar·ma·cog·no·sy/ (fahr″mah-kog´nah-se) the branch of pharmacology dealing with natural drugs and their constituents.

pharmacognosy

(fär′mə-kŏg′nə-sē)
n.
The branch of pharmacology that deals with drugs in their crude or natural state and with medicinal herbs or other plants.

phar′ma·cog′no·sist n.
phar′ma·cog·nos′tic (-kŏg-nŏs′tĭk) adj.

pharmacognosy

the study of chemicals taken from natural sources to be used as drugs or in the preparation of drugs. Sources may include plants, animals, or other life forms such as fungi, molds, and yeasts.

pharmacognosy

(1) Herbal medicine, see there.
(2) The scientific approach to, and formal study of, the effects and uses of medicinal plants.

pharmacognosy

1. Herbal medicine, see there.
2. The scientific approach to and formal study of the effects and uses of medicinal plants. See Herbal medicine, Pharmacognosist; Cf Traditional herbalism.

phar·ma·cog·no·sy

(fahr'mă-kog'nŏ-sē)
A branch of pharmacology concerned with the physical characteristics and botanic and animal sources of crude drugs.
[pharmaco- + G. gnōsis, knowledge]

pharmacognosy (färˈ·m·kägˑ·n·sē),

n the study of medicinal and/or pharmaceutical substances derived from natural sources such as plants, fungi, and animals.

phar·ma·cog·no·sy

(fahr'mă-kog'nŏ-sē)
Branch of pharmacology concerned with physical characteristics and sources of crude drugs.
[pharmaco- + G. gnōsis, knowledge]

pharmacognosy

the branch of pharmacology dealing with natural drugs and their constituents.
References in periodicals archive ?
The industry needs to develop collaboration between herbalists, phytochemists, pharmacognosists, product formulators and manufacturers to develop within the next 10 years analytical testing procedures that are universally agreed upon by all parties and that are 'fit for the purpose' of what the intended testing needs to accomplish.
It is this combination of insight as a clinician and researcher in two countries that makes the book a bridge for pharmacologists, pharmacognosists, clinicians, chemists, and holistic medical practitioners internationally.
Taken as a whole, Geranium and Pelargonium is an excellent resource for the pharmacognosists, phytochemists and phytopharmacologists, as well as other professionals interested in botanical medicine and plant chemistry of these genera.