phallicism


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phal·li·cism

(fal'i-sizm),
Worship of the male genitalia.
Synonym(s): phallism
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
(A Macintosh and hat sufficed for Graham Greene.) His reticence--armed with his umbrella in the London fog--is like a reversal of Melville's exuberant phallicism. In the realm of magical thinking, this is an antidote to the threat of embarrassment and shame.
He already sees a trend in gender studies where, for example, critics attack war's phallicism. The reason he gives for this new groundbreaking is that criticism itself is a battlefield, not only in terms of the sometimes violent exchange of antagonistic ideas it may take, but because war is an extension of politics, culture, and ideology.
(24) It follows that by affiliating with the heron Sylvia transforms her potentially isolate phallicism into a more transcendent, relational one.
The primary cause may be attributed to the lingopasana (phallicism) of the Saiva cult.
phallicism of the penis, discrediting phallic power while
(1) Indeed, the historical significance of what has been termed "phallicism" is beyond question, (2) with some of its most enduring qualities captured succinctly in Herbert Sussman's account of early Victorian representations: "In Carlyle's vision, male is to female as order is to chaos, external hardness to internal fluidity, boundedness to dissolution, containment to eruption, health to disease" (21).
Only upon his exit from the shower does his phallicism reassert itself.
Boebel's contribution to Broken Boundaries yields 'subverted political phallicism' and 'signifiers break[ing] free from their former moorings in phallic discourse' (p.
The greatest crux of critical disagreement comes in regard to Alison, who, according to some, is not morally judged by the tale: she is just a healthy natural woman (Miller 157; Rudat labels Alison as a "Mother Nature figure," whose power in the Tale derives from her association with the "phallicism of the pear tree" in fertility ritual [139]).