phalanx


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pha·lanx

, gen.

pha·lan·gis

, pl.

pha·lan·ges

(fā'langks, fă-langks'; fă-lan'jis; -jēz), Avoid the misspelling phalynx. The singular form is phalanx, not phalange.
1. One of the long bones of the digits, 14 in number for each hand or foot, including two for the thumb or great toe, and three each for the other four digits; designated as proximal, middle, and distal, beginning from the metacarpus.
2. One of a number of cuticular plates, arranged in several rows, on the surface of the spiral organ (of Corti), which are the heads of the outer row of pillar cells and of phalangeal cells; between them are the free ends of the hair cells.
[L. fr. G. phalanx (-ang-), line of soldiers, bone between two joints of the fingers and toes]

phalanx

(fā′lăngks′, făl′ăngks′)
n. pl. phalanxes or phalanges (fə-lăn′jēz, fā-)
1. A compact or close-knit body of people: "formed a solid phalanx in defense of the Constitution and Protestant religion" (G.M. Trevelyan).
2. A formation of infantry carrying overlapping shields and long spears, developed by Philip II of Macedon and used by Alexander the Great.
3. pl. phalanges Anatomy A bone of a finger or toe. Also called phalange.
4. See phalanstery.

pha·lanx

, pl. phalanges (fā'langks, fă-lan'jēz) [TA]
1. One of the long bones of the digits, 14 in number for each hand or foot, two for the thumb or great toe, and three each for the other four digits; designated as proximal, middle, and distal, beginning from the metacarpus.
2. One of a number of cuticular plates, arranged in several rows, on the surface of the spiral organ (of Corti), which are the heads of the outer row of pillar cells and of phalangeal cells.
[L. fr. G. phalanx (-ang-), line of soldiers, bone between two joints of the fingers and toes]

phalanx

A finger or toe bone. Plural PHALANGES.

Phalanx

Any of the digital bones of the hand or foot. Humans have three phalanges to each finger and toe with the exception of the thumb and big toe which have only two each.
References in periodicals archive ?
All Phalanx employees will continue operating out of the firm's existing location under the name Phalanx Healthcare Solutions, an Alera Group Agency LLC.
Cole then examines six key battles in which legion battled phalanx: Heraclea (280 BC), Asculum (279 BC), Beneventum (275 BC), Cynoscephalae (197 BC), Magnesia (190 BC), and Pydna (168 BC)--battles that determined the fate of the ancient world.
The terminal tendon was formed by the conjoint tendons at the level of the midportion of the middle phalanx and traveled from the distal side of the middle phalange to the dorsum of the base of the distal phalanx [Figure 3].
An educator and consultant, Barrett founded Phalanx Media Group in 2011 and publishes The Construct, one of the premier digital marketing publications in the country, a top 100 blog.
Raytheon produces Phalanx, a rapid-fire, computer-controlled radar and 20mm gun system that automatically acquires, tracks and destroys enemy threats that have penetrated other ship defense systems.
At 9 years of age, the patient fractured the proximal phalanx of the right little finger during kendo (Japanese fencing) training.
In addition, there have been changes to the way in which Phalanx systems are upgraded or maintained, he said, with efforts to "improve or enhance the way in which systems are maintained or the way they are repaired," either at pier side or in a land-based facility.
The first interphalangeal joint is between the first and second phalanx. It is a simple, saddle -shaped joint, allowing the movements of extension and flexion.
Osteitis of apex of third phalanx following incorrect hoof trimming in a dairy cow has been reported (Thompson, 1998).
(2) In distal and middle phalangeal lesions, the conventional procedure is transverse amputation, including the head of the proximal neighboring joint of the diseased phalanx, and closing the defect with dorsal and ventral flaps.