phalanx


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pha·lanx

, gen.

pha·lan·gis

, pl.

pha·lan·ges

(fā'langks, fă-langks'; fă-lan'jis; -jēz), Avoid the misspelling phalynx. The singular form is phalanx, not phalange.
1. One of the long bones of the digits, 14 in number for each hand or foot, including two for the thumb or great toe, and three each for the other four digits; designated as proximal, middle, and distal, beginning from the metacarpus.
2. One of a number of cuticular plates, arranged in several rows, on the surface of the spiral organ (of Corti), which are the heads of the outer row of pillar cells and of phalangeal cells; between them are the free ends of the hair cells.
[L. fr. G. phalanx (-ang-), line of soldiers, bone between two joints of the fingers and toes]

phalanx

/pha·lanx/ (fa´langks) pl. phalan´ges   [Gr.]
1. any bone of a finger or toe.
2. any one of a set of plates that are disposed in rows and make up the reticular membrane of the organ of Corti.phalan´geal

phalanx

(fā′lăngks′, făl′ăngks′)
n. pl. phalanxes or phalanges (fə-lăn′jēz, fā-)
1. A compact or close-knit body of people: "formed a solid phalanx in defense of the Constitution and Protestant religion" (G.M. Trevelyan).
2. A formation of infantry carrying overlapping shields and long spears, developed by Philip II of Macedon and used by Alexander the Great.
3. pl. phalanges Anatomy A bone of a finger or toe. Also called phalange.
4. See phalanstery.

phalanx (phal)

[fā′langks] pl. phalanges [phal ]
Etymology: Gk, line of soldiers
any of the 14 tapering bones composing the fingers of each hand and the toes of each foot. They are arranged in three rows at the distal end of the metacarpus and the metatarsus. The fingers each have three phalanges (proximal, middle, and distal); the thumb has two. Toes 2 through 5 each have three phalanges; the great toe has two (proximal and distal). The phalanges of the foot are smaller and less flexible than those of the hand.
enlarge picture
Phalanges of the foot

pha·lanx

, pl. phalanges (fā'langks, fă-lan'jēz) [TA]
1. One of the long bones of the digits, 14 in number for each hand or foot, two for the thumb or great toe, and three each for the other four digits; designated as proximal, middle, and distal, beginning from the metacarpus.
2. One of a number of cuticular plates, arranged in several rows, on the surface of the spiral organ (of Corti), which are the heads of the outer row of pillar cells and of phalangeal cells.
[L. fr. G. phalanx (-ang-), line of soldiers, bone between two joints of the fingers and toes]

phalanx

A finger or toe bone. Plural PHALANGES.

Phalanx

Any of the digital bones of the hand or foot. Humans have three phalanges to each finger and toe with the exception of the thumb and big toe which have only two each.

phalanx

pl. phalanges [Gr.] any of the principal bones of a digit. See also Table 10.

inherited reduced phalanx
a congenital absence of the first two phalanges on all limbs. The hoof and third phalanx are attached by skin. An inherited defect in cattle.
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