phagocyte


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to phagocyte: mononuclear phagocyte system

phagocyte

 [fag´o-sīt]
any cell capable of ingesting particulate matter, usually referring to a microphage, macrophage, or monocyte. They ingest microorganisms and other particulate antigens that are coated with antibody or complement (opsonized), a process mediated by specific cell-surface receptors. Other cell types exhibit phagocytosis, but not specific phagocytosis of opsonized particles.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

phag·o·cyte

(fag'ō-sīt),
A cell that can ingest bacteria, foreign particles, and other cells. Phagocytes ingest and kill microbes, present antigen to lymphocytes, scavenge degenerating material, and release mediators. classes: 1) microphages, polymorphonuclear leukocytes that ingest chiefly bacteria; 2) macrophages, mononucleated cells (histiocytes and monocytes) that are largely scavengers, ingesting dead tissue and degenerated cells.
[phago- + G. kytos, cell]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

phagocyte

(făg′ə-sīt′)
n.
A cell, such as a white blood cell, that engulfs and absorbs waste material, harmful microorganisms, or other foreign bodies in the bloodstream and tissues.

phag′o·cyt′ic (-sĭt′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

phagocyte

A cell (e.g., macrophage, neutrophil, eosinophil, etc.) capable of phagocytosing (engulfing) particles (e.g., bacteria and other microorganisms, foreign matter, etc.).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

phag·o·cyte

(fag'ō-sīt)
A cell possessing the property of ingesting bacteria, foreign particles, and other cells. Phagocytes are divided into two general classes: 1) microphages, polymorphonuclear leukocytes that ingest chiefly bacteria; and 2) macrophages, mononucleated cells (histiocytes and monocytes) that are largely scavengers, ingesting dead tissue and degenerated cells.
[phago- + G. kytos, cell]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

phagocyte

An AMOEBOID cell of the immune system that responds to contact with a foreign object, such as a bacterium, by surrounding, engulfing and digesting it. Phagocytes occur widely throughout the body wherever they are likely to be required. Some wander freely throughout the tissues. They include macrophages and neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocytes (‘polymorphs’). >From the Greek phago , eating and kutos , a hollow or receptacle.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

phagocyte

a cell that is capable of amoeboid movement, flowing round and engulfing material from its surroundings. Such cells are capable of discriminating between different particles. For example, phagocytic white blood cells will engulf only certain BACTERIA. Phagocytes form an important defence mechanism in higher animals, particularly against bacteria which are engulfed and digested. See MACROPHAGE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

phag·o·cyte

(fag'ō-sīt)
Cell that can ingestbacteria, foreign particles, and other cells.
[phago- + G. kytos, cell]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Helper T-cells coordinate the immune response by communicating with other cells, which stimulates B-cells to produce more antibodies and attracts more T-cells and cell-eating phagocytes. Killer T-cells (cytotoxic T-lymphocytes) attack pathogenic cells and are particularly useful for fighting viruses.
When a particle interacts with phagocyte receptors, a series of signaling events are triggered to activate phagocytosis.
A molecular mechanism for autoinhibition of the tandem SH3 domains of p47phox, the regulatory subunit of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase.
Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a relatively rare genetic disorder characterised by defect in respiratory burst activity of phagocytes that is associated with intracellular killing of phagocytosed microorganisms.1 In CGD, the primary defect is associated with the key enzyme, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase.
Cigarette smoke impairs the clearance of apoptotic cells by phagocytes (13,14) and thus may inhibit the expression of macrophage surface molecules that recognize apoptotic cells (11).
If nagalase can be disrupted, then the phagocytes of the immune system would be able to proceed with lysing of the fermenting cell.
We hypothesized that the extract might regulate this process in the stimulus-activated phagocytes. In parallel, high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometric (HPLC-ESMS) detection was employed to identify phenolic constituents in the ethanolic extract.
At the same time, complement proteins coat the surface of pathogens, signalling and providing receptor binding sites for professional phagocytes to attach--a process called opsonisation.
The respiratory burst activity of phagocytes has been used frequently as an indicator of nonspecific immunity in fish (Anderson and Siwicki, 1995; Sahoo and Mukherjee, 2002; Sahoo et al., 2005).
Carneiro-Sampaio, "Evaluation of a fluorochrome assay for assessing the bactericidal activity of neutrophils in human phagocyte dysfunctions," Journal of Immunological Methods, vol.
Congenital Recurrent and X-linked chronic defects of severe bacterial, granulomatous phagocyte number, mycobacterial and disease function, or both fungal infections (respiratory, cutaneous) or deep-seated abscesses 6.
Their topics include whether the mechanics of cell-matrix adhesion is amenable to physical modeling, the role of proteins and water in the initial attachment of mammalian cells to biomedical surfaces, monitoring cell adhesion using substrate-integrated sensors, continuous photobleaching to study the growth modes of focal adhesions, a versatile gradient of biomolecules for regulating cell behavior, surface engineering and cell adhesion, plasma polymer surfaces for cell expansion and delivery, and phagocyte decisions at interfaces.