petrous part of temporal bone

(redirected from petrous pyramid)

part

 
a division of a larger structure.
mastoid part of temporal bone the posterior portion of the petrous (or petromastoid) part. Called also mastoid bone.
petromastoid part of temporal bone see petrous part of temporal bone.
petrous part of temporal bone the part of the temporal bone located at the base of the cranium, containing the inner ear. Some anatomists divide it into two separate subparts, calling the posterior section the mastoid part, reserving the term petrous part for the anterior section only, and calling the entire area the petromastoid part. Called also petrous bone.
squamous part of temporal bone the flat, scalelike, anterior superior portion of the temporal bone. Called also squamous bone.
tympanic part of temporal bone the part of the temporal bone forming the anterior and inferior walls and part of the posterior wall of the external acoustic meatus. Called also tympanic bone.

pet·rous part of tem·po·ral bone

[TA]
the part of the temporal bone that contains the structures of the inner ear and the second part of the internal carotid artery; in prenatal life it appears as a separate ossification center.

pet·rous part of tem·po·ral bone

(pet'rŭs pahrt tem'pŏr-ăl bōn) [TA]
The part of the temporal bone that contains the structures of the internal ear and the second part of the internal carotid artery; in prenatal life, it appears as a separate ossification center.
References in periodicals archive ?
They are so named because they run parallel to the long axis of the petrous pyramid.
Denecke was a pioneer in the field of tumor surgery of the lateral skull base, especially in the difficult surgery of extended chemodectomas of the petrous pyramid and the jugular glomus.
The two major concerns with this route are (1) the need for a wide temporal lobe retraction to permit a broad view of the anterior surface of the petrous pyramid and (2) the difficulty in finding anatomic landmarks that allow for the correct identification of and access to the internal acoustic canal and the fallopian channel without damaging the labyrinth.
Surgical therapy for the release of suppurations of the petrous pyramid.
The canal then bends at a right angle, courses horizontally in an anteromedial direction, and ends at the apex of the petrous pyramid.
Dissections performed in our temporal bone laboratory have shown that we can find the endolymphatic sac by following anatomic landmarks on the posterosuperior wall of the petrous pyramid.