petrous


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petrous

 [pet´rus]
resembling rock or stone; stony.

pet·rous

(pet'rŭs, pē'trŭs),
1. Of stony hardness.
2. Synonym(s): petrosal
[L. petrosus, fr. petra, a rock]

petrous

(pĕt′rəs)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or resembling rock, especially in hardness; stony.
2. Of or relating to the very dense, hard portion of the temporal bone that forms a protective case for the inner ear.

pet·rous

(pet'rŭs)
1. Of stony hardness.
2. Synonym(s): petrosal.
[L. petrosus, fr. petra, a rock]
References in periodicals archive ?
--Length of the posterior surface of the petrous: the length of the straight line drawn from the apex to the base of the posterior surface of the petrous which divides the porus to superior and inferior parts.
Jackler and Cho have proposed that the mechanism for the formation of cholesterol granulomas involves a spontaneous hemorrhage into a well-pneumatized petrous apex air-cell system from adjacent bone marrow.
The patient prognosis worsens with the involvement of the facial nerve, the petrous apex, and increasing proximity to the brain.
The tumor was inseparable from the VII c.n., as we could expect due to preoperative FN palsy; therefore, the section of the great petrous superficial nerve and part of the first and the second tracts of the FN were mandatory to remove the entire pathology (Figure 3).
The routine examination of the ear by endoscopy has increased chances of early diagnosis and treatment leading to avoidance of very complicated and advanced spread of the disease in the petrous apex and labyrinth.
By definition, petrous apex cephalocele is the cystic expansion and herniation of the posterolateral portion of Meckel's cave into the superomedial portion of petrous apex.
Ewing's Sarcoma of the Petrous Temporal Bone: Case Report and Literature Review.
Petrositis diagnosis requires imaging studies, namely, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or nuclear imaging techniques, to identify the petrous apex as the site of the inflammatory process [3].
Some secondary reasons have been reported: herpes zoster, temporomandibular joint dysfunction, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, petrous bone osteoma, and neuroborreliosis (5,6).
The petrous bone may be hypoplastic whereas the otic capsule may be hypoplastic or aplastic (4).
"It was the petrous bone that gave such magnificent results," Zalloua said.
The first descriptive study of the area where the abducens nerve passes at the apex of the petrous temporal region was performed by Russian anatomist Wenzel Gruber in 1859 (Marom, 2011; Ezer et al., 2012).