petrification


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petrification

[pet′rifikā′shən]
the process of becoming calcified or stonelike.

petrification

the process of mineralization of an organism (fossilization) through saturation by a solution of minerals.
References in periodicals archive ?
In "On the Medusa," such revolutionary potential seems immediately transformed by the containing dynamic of "error"--language's "disfiguring" power, Paul de Man might say--which "kindles" the "gleam" of the serpents' "brazen glare," and turns the breath of life into a self-reflecting mirror, the instrument of Medusa's undoing, making the gorgon complied in her own petrification.
Petrified logs and stumps and teeth and fern are pieces of petrification and any size is of value.
It is only in Perseus's hands that the Medusa becomes a tool of immortality, as illustrated by the wedding banquet scene in Cepheus's palace in Book 5 of the Metamorphoses, where petrification into marble is explicitly linked to fame and exemplarity in the case of Phineus.
Elle seule sans doute peut guerir cette 'penible scission,' cette rupture entre les choses et les mots, les idees et les signes, cette separation entre la culture et la vie--cette petrification mortifere qu'Artaud voit partout a l'ceuvre dans le monde occidental" (Artaud and Grossman 6).
This petrification process generally results in a Quartz and Chalcedony mineralization.
Both texts use the narrative of Proserpina's rape as metaphor for figurations of exploitation --the sexual, socio-cultural, economic or otherwise linguistic oppression Fumagalli cites as indicative of North Atlantic modernity's petrification of the Caribbean--while nonetheless gesturing toward spaces of emancipation and self-actualization.
But Ophelia, too, who could be the main character other than Hamlet, as Muller points out (51), is a desiring-machine, the everywoman who operates in the present tense, doing (verbal) violence to the oppression by which the Europe of men define her; yet, she is not only the one the river didn't keep but in the end herself "the petrification of a hope" (57): "Ophelia remains on stage, motionless in her white wrappings," (44) Ophelia, too, is subject to the suspended transformation of love into death, the impossible, useless, incomprehensible, delirious explosion of the psychopolitical.
Bradbury, meanwhile, investigates mineral water, from the rebirth of the bottling industry in Harrogate to the petrification of sundry objects--including John Wayne's hat and Agatha Christie's handbag--at a limestone waterfall.
He sought the reasons which caused this crisis, the factors which were responsible for the petrification and decay of Marxism.
Jarrell's personae are always involved with efforts to escape engulfment, implosion, and petrification, by demanding that they somehow be miraculously changed by life and art into people whose ontologies are psychically secure.