petrifaction


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Related to petrifaction: petrification, petrified

pet·ri·fac·tion

(pet'ri-fak'shŭn),
Fossilization, as in conversion into stone.
[L. petra, rock + facio, to make]

pet·ri·fac·tion

(pet'ri-fak'shŭn)
Fossilization, as in conversion into stone.
[L. petra, rock + facio, to make]

petrifaction

(pĕt-rĭ-făk′shŭn) [L. petra, stone, + facere, to make]
The process of changing into stone or hard substance.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Petrifaction is turning of human, plant or any other object to stone.
220)--and convinced he alone sees the creeping petrifaction that grips Maud's characters and threaten to incorporate them into the geological system of dead nature, experiences language as devoid of teleological meaning.
In Balzac's sections, the progressive petrifaction of individuals into social types is almost a constant fact.
Olivero passes through the various stages, becoming such an adept, and ultimately like all other sages is gradually extinguished in crystalline petrifaction.
If we accept our universe's laws of physics, chemistry, and biology, flying dragons are aerodynamically impossible, invisible cats should have no bodily substance, and one should not expect instant petrifaction of living organisms to happen merely by shouting at them.
The long history of political division led to the petrifaction of local interests and crippled the development of any sense of commonality.
Does Martha now, after the loss of her daughter and her own emotional petrifaction, see a link between herself and the ancient figure of Athena?
The last stage of its petrifaction takes geopolitical and economic forms that sell purity as fake peace (the erasure of Israel, the burial of the genuine original by the imperial fraud).
This can be done by measuring the distance between benevolent criteria and its antithesis such as: development against destruction, peace against war, maturity against tyranny, right against wrong, creativity in return for petrifaction, and closure in return for openness.
Rigidities and automatism emerge--for example, to comic effect--not as the polar opposite of some putative 'pure life' but as instances of petrifaction within the processes generated by the difficult co-implication of subject and Other.
Feminist writer Anna Chave finds much amiss, here, much repeating from an old misogyny, but also laughs: the women hit back, with eyes, with angles, with take-no-prisoners, Medusa-headed terror; the clientele, the bordello-johns, the solicited soliciters offered gendered petrifaction, offered anger like a Matisse in his first viewing, or like the tittering of a Derain or Braque, not knowing how much they disclose in their uncomfortable guffaws (Chave, 263, 267, 271).
The Edwardian melodrama is based on George Bernard Shaw's Passion, Poison and Petrifaction and will be performed in a new English translation by David.