pestilent


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pestilent

(pĕs′tə-lənt)
adj.
a. Causing or likely to cause epidemic disease: a pestilent swamp.
b. Infectious or epidemic: a pestilent disease.
c. Archaic Tending to cause death; deadly.
References in periodicals archive ?
In these pestilent and perilous times, the very idea of distinction between truth and falsehood is under siege.
A mutiny," he wrote, "is threatened by soldiers in Ireland for want of pay, scarcity of victuals, now partly remedied, but the pestilent flux of the country has now come upon them, which kills many, and forces some to return to England.
Despite the application of comprehensive evidence-based interventions and policies specifically designed to effectively address and curb the problem of BD among the college student population, campuses across the United States continue to struggle with this pestilent issue.
Haste, when unduly applied in the context of the criminal justice system, such that it constitutes a blatant failure to respect and uphold a person's fundamental rights, and to observe the guarantees enshrined in the Constitution to protect the rights of the accused, it results in something far more destructive, more pestilent and graver than mere imperfection,' De Lima said in her 82-page petition.
84) In manuscript notes for a lecture on "Fate"--which Whitman may have attended in New York in early 1852--Emerson theorizes that "the existence of evil & malignant men does not depend [on] themselves or on men; it seems to indicate a virulence that remains uncured in the Universe,--uncured & corrupting, & hurling out these pestilent rats and tigers, & men rat-like & wolf-like.
Malnutrition and childhood pestilent diseases, including measles, mumps, meningitis, polio, malaria, and cholera, are endemic among these populations (MSF 2010a; Ogwumike et al.
They should do a survey in the seaside areas, perhaps people would be happy to pay a couple of pence on the council tax if it was used to rid them of that annual pestilent plague.
Her paper 'An Ocean of Locusts--The Perception and Control of Insect Pests in Prussian Brandenburg (1700-1850)' thus presents a useful document of another so-called pestilent species at work--one with a distinguished provenance in cultural literature and a significance presence in systems of agricultural management.
Between 3,000 and 5,000 refugees (estimates vary and the fluid population is hard to count), live in this lawless, pestilent slum.
pestilence (bubonic plague) gave rise to the figurative meaning of pestilent 'harmful or dangerous to religious, moral, or social order' (dating back to 1475), while leprosy became an emblem of decay and corruption.
The choice of insecticide, if one is needed, depends on confirming the damage was indeed caused by a pest, and then identifying the pestilent perpetrator.