pestilence

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pestilence

 [pes´tĭ-lens]
a virulent contagious epidemic or infectious epidemic disease. adj., adj pestilen´tial.

pes·ti·lence

(pes'ti-lens),
1. Synonym(s): plague (2)
2. A virulent outbreak of any disease.
[L. pestilentia]

pestilence

/pes·ti·lence/ (pes´tĭ-lins) a virulent contagious epidemic or infectious epidemic disease.pestilen´tial

pestilence

(pĕs′tə-ləns)
n.
A usually fatal epidemic disease, especially bubonic plague.

pestilence

[pes′tiləns]
Etymology: L, pestilentia, infectious disease
any epidemic of a virulent infectious or contagious disease.

pestilence

noun An obsolete, non-specific term for an epidemic with high mortality.
 
adjective Malodorous.

pes·ti·lence

(pes'ti-lĕns)
1. Synonym(s): plague (2) .
2. A virulent outbreak of any disease.
[L. pestilentia]

pestilence (pes·t·lens),

n any epidemic of a disease that is virulent and devastating.
Enlarge picture
Pessaries.

pestilence

a virulent contagious epidemic or infectious epidemic disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
There in 1377, and later when pestilences were abroad, incoming persons and ships were first isolated on a nearby island for 30 days (trentina) to await clinical signs of a contagion or evidence of continued good health.
Since letters seemed an unlikely means of spreading pestilences, disinfection of mail declined, but some authorities continued to see a potential risk in mail from patients with tuberculosis and leprosy.
We no longer call such diseases plagues or pestilences, but that does not alter or reduce their threat.
The boom in fast travel and trade, jetting people and their goods from continent to continent in just hours, spreads wildlife pestilences just as it does human diseases.
If the God of plagues and pestilences is out there, and if this God does not take kindly to the oppression of the weak and downtrodden, then I think I need to worry a lot.
He stated, "There is overpopulation at the end of dynasties, and pestilences and famines frequently occur then.
They show the farmer as the victim of storms and devastating crop pestilences, cut off from ordinary social intercourse, and in many instances crushed beneath a mortgage.