perverse incentive


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perverse incentive

Any incentive—e.g., an “item of service” payment—for a clinician to perform ineffective or potentially harmful procedure.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
HMOs), perverse incentives are part of the system, as someone other than the patient and physician determine what is "medically necessary." In CMS's most recent flat-fee payment model, there is a demonstrated willingness to exchange the perverse incentive to provide more care for the perverse incentive to provide less care or, in some cases, no care at all.
This creates a perverse incentive to not participate in the college readiness programs the Legislature and various administrations have tried to establish and encourage.
"In a market where lower supply equals higher prices, that creates a perverse incentive, one that does not encourage them to build the homes we need."
Wait described the slightly higher wages for new graduates in aged care as a "perverse incentive" and something of a concern for NZNO.
The Civil Asset Forfeiture Amendment Act of 2014 removes the perverse incentive of allowing police and prosecutors to keep what they seize.
The BBC article reports a perverse incentive: Doctors and hospitals who report treating foreigners must recoup funds from other governments on their own, or say nothing and receive NHS payments.
Our system already appears to give people a perverse incentive to be unemployed rather than working.
In an interview with The Daily Telegraph, he said that current rules give the unions a "perverse incentive" to take industrial action.
Under the current system, claimants do not have to pay anything if they lose a case, giving people a perverse incentive to sue and ramp up their claims, the Ministry of Justice has said.
Rather, these institutions are simply responding to the perverse incentive system they confront.