perversion

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perversion

 [per-ver´zhun]
1. deviation from the normal course; a morbid alteration of function which may occur in emotional, intellectual, or volitional fields.
sexual perversion sexual deviation.

per·ver·sion

(per-ver'zhŭn), Negative and pejorative connotations of this word may render it offensive in some contexts.
A deviation from the norm, especially concerning sexual interests or behavior.
[L. perversio, fr. per-verto, pp. -versus, to turn about]

perversion

/per·ver·sion/ (per-ver´zhun)
1. deviation from the normal course.
2. sexual perversion; see under deviation.

perversion

[pərvur′shən]
Etymology: L, pervertere, to turn about
1 any deviation from what is considered normal or natural.
2 the act of causing a change from what is normal or natural.
3
Usage notes: (informal)
(in psychiatry) any of a number of sexual practices that deviate from what is considered normal adult behavior. See also paraphilia.

perversion

(1) Paraphilia (sexual deviancy), see there.  
(2) A nonspecific term for any deviation from a norm.

per·ver·sion

(pĕr-ver'zhŭn) Negative and pejorative connotations of this word may render it offensive in some contexts.
A deviation from the norm, especially concerning sexual interests or behavior.
[L. perversio, fr. per-verto, pp. -versus, to turn about]
References in periodicals archive ?
A law scholar's work is to make law sound and demonstrate law's soundness rather than represent law as perverse.
Jack Perverse and James Hearne are two eighteenth-century children--one fictional, one historical--in whom we see a collision between the complex discourses of childhood and perversity.
On August 13, one of the students, a Polish man identified only as Piotr Z, 27, received a six-month suspended sentence for possessing 1,700 images of perverse sex with children after the discovery of the pornographic and homosexual ring.
The House Committee on Resources, where many conservation bills originate, is chaired by California Republican Richard Pombo, a former rancher who has called critical habitat requirements "one of the most perverse shortcomings" of the ESA.
By identifying so maW schools as failing--as North Carolina and Kentucky suggest, the numbers are often exponentially more than even the most rigorous state accountability systems turn up--NCLB has also created a pair of perverse incentives for states and schools to act in ways directly counter to the law's intent.
One of the perverse byproducts of the media's current fascination with CEOs--call the coverage "CEOs Behaving Badly"--is that despite gallons of ink devoted to executive debacles, reporters and the public know less about the roles and functions of today's CEO than ever.
In fact, evaluation systems with a fairly large amount of error in measuring productivity can still be effective at motivating improvement -- if the errors are mostly random, or at the very least do not create perverse incentives, such as encouraging teachers to focus on improving the achievement of one group of students to the exclusion of others.
The first major independent study of policing in London for 20 years said Whitehall's demands to prioritise basic crime-fighting had resulted in "specific perverse effects".
Aubrey Nealon's In Memoriam is another example; a droll drama revolving around a junior financial adviser who finally gets his big break, Tom is assigned to the prestigious, if slightly perverse portfolio of a very wealthy client; trouble is, the client is dead.
He told reporters," The drugs that are being burned here today will not reach their perverse end of degrading our youth and encouraging crime.
If you believe as Darwin believed, you do so because you are morally perverse, as Darwin was morally perverse.