pertussis


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Related to pertussis: Bordetella pertussis

pertussis

 [per-tus´is]
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

per·tus·sis

(per-tŭs'is),
An acute infectious inflammation of the larynx, trachea, and bronchi caused by Bordetella pertussis; characterized by recurrent bouts of spasmodic coughing that continues until the breath is exhausted, then ending in a noisy inspiratory stridor (the "whoop") caused by laryngeal spasm.
[L. per, very (intensive), + tussis, cough]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pertussis

(pər-tŭs′ĭs)
per·tus′sal adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

pertussis

Whooping cough Pediatrics An acute contagious and potentially epidemic bacterial infection caused by Bordetella pertussis–less commonly, B bronchoseptica and B parapertussis, which affects children < age 5; it causes 600,000 deaths/yr in the world Clinical Paroxysmal cough, post-tussive emesis, cyanosis, apnea, whoop Complications Pneumonia, atelectasis Diagnosis Culture, direct fluorescent antibody, lymphocytosis Management Supportive; infants may need hospitalization if coughing is severe Treatment Erythromycin, T-S Vaccine Whole cell–DPT vaccine
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

per·tus·sis

(pĕr-tŭs'is)
An acute infectious inflammation of the larynx, trachea, and bronchi caused by Bordetella pertussis; characterized by recurrent bouts of spasmodic coughing that continues until the breath is exhausted, then ends in a noisy inspiratory stridor (the "whoop") caused by laryngeal spasm.
Synonym(s): whooping cough.
[L. per, very (intensive), + tussis, cough]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

pertussis

See WHOOPING COUGH.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

per·tus·sis

(pĕr-tŭs'is)
Acute infectious inflammation of larynx, trachea, and bronchi caused by Bordetella pertussis.
Synonym(s): whooping cough.
[L. per, very (intensive), + tussis, cough]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
A person with pertussis needs to take deep breaths after coughing thus producing the "whooping" sound, as per the (https://www.cdc.gov/pertussis/about/causes-transmission.html) CDC.
pertussis isolates recovered by state public health laboratories through routine surveillance and outbreaks or the Enhanced Pertussis Surveillance/ Emerging Infections Program Network (7).
"Immunization with Tdap vaccine during the third trimester of pregnancy, compared with no immunization, was associated with higher neonatal concentrations of pertussis toxin antibodies," conclude the authors.
Pertussis is known for uncontrollable, violent coughing which often makes it hard to breathe.
pertussis etiology and to evaluate the contribution of other Bordetella species.
In the United States, investigators at Northern California Kaiser Permanente have shown that the effectiveness of acellular pertussis in the Tdap vaccine wanes rapidly in adolescents.
Pertussis, commonly known as whooping cough, is a contagious respiratory disease caused by the organism Bordetella pertussis.
Reinfection after natural disease or vaccination is not uncommon [5]; however, the index of clinical suspicion of pertussis diagnosis in adults remains low.
aP appears to produce reasonable protection (approximately 84% overall) for infants and preschool children, plus a much improved adverse effect profile, compared with whole-cell pertussis vaccine (WCP), which provided approximately 94% protection.
The objective of maternal pertussis vaccination is twofold: it induces or boosts antibody responses in the pregnant woman, which protects the infant through early infancy, and it protects the mother against pertussis infection that may be passed on to her infant postnatally.
In the Czech Republic (Czechoslovakia), vaccination against diphtheria started in 1946, against tuberculosis 1953, tetanus 1956, pertussis 1958, polio 1960, measles 1969, and German measles 1986 (SZU, Vaccination, 2008).