personality tests


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personality tests

Tests, usually in the form of elaborate and lengthy questionnaires, that purport to classify people according to personality traits or types. They are used for psychological research and to assess suitability for various forms of employment. The value of these tests has not been established.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dubbed the "Big Five" approach, this has become the basis of many of the modern personality tests on the market today.
A: A typical personality test (also called personality assessment) compares a candidate's basic traits with a job's requirements.
Research on these personality tests helps us gain a better understanding of how various personality traits may affect academic outcomes and other important life outcomes," McAbee said.
HISTORY The benchmark trait personality test is the 16PF, developed in 1949 as a description of the general human personality.
Future doctors, lawyers, firefighters, service industry employees, Catholic priests, and even professional athletes are routinely subjected to personality tests as a condition of their employment.
Administering personality tests concurrently with the armed services vocational aptitude battery would give students insight into the types of work most suitable for them.
Asda has introduced online personality tests in a bid to slash the length of time it takes to hire new staff.
Annie Murphy Paul's The Cult of Personality is a good summary of some of the problems with personality tests.
But if personality tests have even a tenth of the problems of bias and inadequate results that has followed intelligence tests, we may be looking forward to years of court cases based on the reliability of these tests as hiring and firing tools.
Based on popular psychometric personality tests, the AXA Business Personality Profile categorises companies in five key aspects of their behaviour.
Research shows that personality tests of as few as four questions can significantly improve the predictive power of standard underwriting variables such as credit score, gender and age.
To boost productivity, a human resource director wonders whether implementing competency and personality tests for prospective employees would be worthwhile.