personality inventory

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Related to personality inventories: MMPI

per·son·al·i·ty in·ven·tor·y

a psychological test for evaluation of habitual modes of behavior, thinking, and feeling based on the comparable characteristics of people in one's peer group.
References in periodicals archive ?
The construct validity of three entry level personality inventories used in the U.K.: A cautionary multiple-inventory investigation.
The results of the present study can also be considered in relation to recent research which shows that intentional distortion does not seriously affect the criterion validity of personality inventories in applicant settings (Hough, 1998; Ones & Viswesvaran, 1998; Ones, Viswesvaran, & Reiss, 1996), and that the Big Five have little adverse impact against minorities (Collins & Gleaves, 1998; Ones & Anderson, 1999).
Convergence among three personality inventories measuring the Big Five.
Construct validity of two personality inventories based on the Five Factor Model.
In a smaller scale investigation of gender differences on 11 personality inventories used for personnel selection in the USA, Hough (1998) reported negligible gender differences for most of the personality variables she examined.
Across 11 personality inventories used in personnel selection in the USA, Hough (1998) reported negligible ethnic group differences for most of the personality variables she examined.
The personality inventories used were the British versions of the Hogan Personality Inventory (HPI), the Business Personality Indicator (BPI), and the Occupational Personality Questionnaire (OPQ).
Different personality inventories, and even scales within the same instrument, do not have the same variability and scoring.
We first present the results for gender differences on the three personality inventories examined and then turn our attention to ethnic group differences.
Tables 4, 5, and 6 present ethnic group differences on the three personality inventories investigated.
The magnitude of mean differences reported here for the three personality inventories are quite similar to the results for gender differences on personality measures reported by Hough and colleagues (Hough, 1998; Hough, Oswald, & Ployhart, 2001) in the USA.
There has been much recent debate about the degree to which 'impression management' or 'faking good' affects scores on personality inventories (e.g.

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