personality


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Related to personality: personality test, Personality types

personality

 [per″sŭ-nal´ĭ-te]
the characteristic way that a person thinks, feels, and behaves; the relatively stable and predictable part of a person's thought and behavior; it includes conscious attitudes, values, and styles as well as unconscious conflicts and defense mechanisms. Personality traits are simple features of normal and abnormal personalities. Personality types are categories applicable to both normal and abnormal personalities; usually they belong to a coherent typology, such as introvert/extrovert or oral/anal/phallic.
Early Life and Personality. The newborn comes into the world completely dependent on others for satisfying individual basic human needs. Feelings of security in a relationship with the mother, or an adequate substitute, is the cornerstone of mental health in later years.

As children develop, they need to learn and to meet the day-to-day problems of life, and to master them. In resolving these challenges, one chooses solutions from many possibilities. Psychologists have studied how these choices are made and use technical terms to describe them, such as repression and sublimation. The behavior patterns chosen result in certain character traits which will influence a child's way of meeting the world—whether the child will lead or follow, be conscientious or reckless, imitate his or her parents or prefer to be as different from them as possible, or take a realistic, flexible path between these extremes. The sum total of these traits represents the personality.
The Well-Adjusted Personality. A well-adjusted individual is one who adapts to surroundings. If adaptation is not possible, the individual makes realistic efforts to change the situation, using personal talents and abilities constructively and successfully. The well-adjusted person is realistic and able to face facts whether they are pleasant or unpleasant, and deals with them instead of merely worrying about them or denying them. Well-adjusted mature persons are independent. They form reasoned opinions and then act on them. They seek a reasonable amount of information and advice before making a decision, and once the decision is made, they are willing to face the consequences of it. They do not try to force others to make decisions for them. An ability to love others is typical of the well-adjusted individual. In addition, the mature well adjusted person is also able to enjoy receiving love and affection and can accept a reasonable dependence on others.
alternating personality multiple personality disorder.
cyclothymic personality a temperament characterized by rapid, frequent swings between sad and cheerful moods; see also cyclothymic disorder.
personality disorders a group of mental disorders characterized by enduring, inflexible, and maladaptive personality traits that deviate markedly from cultural expectations, pervade a broad range of situations, and are either a source of subjective distress or a cause of significant impairment in social, occupational, or other functioning. In general, they are difficult both to diagnose and to treat.

Although individuals with a personality disorder can function in day-to-day life, they are hampered both emotionally and psychologically by the maladaptive nature of their disorder, and their chances of forming good relationships and fulfilling their potentialities are poor. In spite of their problems, these patients refuse to acknowledge that anything is wrong and insist that it is the rest of the world that is out of step. Very often their behavior is extremely annoying to those around them.

Personality disorders result from unresolved conflicts, often dating back to childhood. To alleviate the anxiety and depression that accompany these conflicts, the ego uses defense mechanisms. Although defense mechanisms are not pathological in themselves, they become maladaptive in individuals with personality disorders.

The category includes: antisocial personality disorder, avoidant personality disorder, borderline personality disorder, dependent personality disorder, histrionic personality disorder, narcissistic personality disorder, obsessive-compulsive personality disorder, paranoid personality disorder, schizoid personality disorder, and schizotypal personality disorder. Distinguishing one disorder from another can be difficult because the various traits can occur in more than one disorder. For example, patients with borderline personality disorder and those with narcissistic personality disorder both may have a tendency to angry outbursts and may be hindered in forming interpersonal relationships because they often exploit, idealize, or devalue others. The symptoms of a personality disorder may also occur as features of another mental disorder. More than one personality disorder can exist in the same person.

Because patients refuse to admit that there is anything wrong, personality disorders are more difficult to treat than other mental disorders. However, a great deal can be done in many cases, if the therapist can break through a patient's defense mechanisms and help the patient resolve the underlying conflict.
double personality (dual personality) dissociative identity disorder.
hysterical personality former name for histrionic personality disorder.
multiple personality a dissociative disorder in which an individual adopts two or more personalities alternately. See multiple personality disorder.
split personality an obsolete term formerly used colloquially to refer to either schizophrenia or dissociative identity disorder.

per·son·al·i·ty

(per'sŏn-al'i-tē),
1. The unique self, the totality of someone's conscious and unconscious cognition and interpersonal behavior and related emotional responses; the sum of the integrated and unintegrated personality traits used by an individual to relate to others.
2. Someone with a particular personality pattern.

personality

(pûr′sə-năl′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. personali·ties
a. The totality of qualities and traits, as of character or behavior, that are peculiar to a specific person.
b. The totality of behavioral traits that are peculiar to a specific nonhuman animal: a hyena with an assertive personality.
c. The totality of qualities that distinguish a group, organization, or place: The personality of the business changed dramatically over the years.

personality

The behavioural and mental traits which distinguish human beings from each other.

personality

Psychiatry The distinctive attributes of a person or characteristic manner of thinking, feeling, behaving; the ingrained pattem of behavior that each person evolves, consciously and unconsciously, lifestyle, way of being in adapting to the environment Traits/'superfactors' of personality
1. Extraversion–eg, positive emotionality.
2. Neuroticism–eg, negative emotionality.
3. Conscientiousness–eg, constraint.
4. Agreeableness–eg, aggression.
5. Openness–eg, absorption. See Borderline personality, Cancer-prone personality, Explosive personality, Multiple personality, Obsessive-compulsive personality, Type A personality, Type B personality.

per·son·al·i·ty

(pĕr'sŏn-al'i-tē)
1. The unique self; the organized system of attitudes and behavioral predispositions by which one feels, thinks, acts, and impresses and establishes relationships with others.
2. An individual with a particular personality pattern.

personality

The totality of a person's mental and behavioural characteristics as modified by experience and education. Personality defines a unique, recognizable individual and is developed as a result of the interaction of the inherited elements and the life-time environment.

Personality

The organized pattern of behaviors and attitudes that makes a human being distinctive. Personality is formed by the ongoing interaction of temperament, character, and environment.
Mentioned in: Personality Disorders

per·son·al·i·ty

(pĕr'sŏn-al'i-tē)
Unique self, totality of someone's conscious and unconscious cognition and interpersonal behavior and related emotional responses.

Patient discussion about personality

Q. Do you personally know anyone that's autistic? Right, I agree 1 in 150 is diagnosed with autism. Do you personally know anyone that's autistic?

A. Yes as per the latest statistics in U.S it is 1 out of 150 of kids born has autism. I know 5 kids, all friends of family; all moms were on fertility drugs to get pg. Very sad. Two of the kids are twins and besides being autistic they have cerebral palsy.

Q. Alcoholism becomes a habit in person? How does alcoholism becomes a habit in person?

A. If you think about alcohol all the time and you need it to feel good then it's a problem. If it's just a rare but pleasant action then there is no big disaster.
It may be a problem if the alcohol being the cause of depending (physical or corporial it is not just the same!)

Q. How can persons with autism learn best? The person with autism can’t concentrate on studies? How can persons with autism learn best?

A. Where have you read such a misguiding message? No one can say that the person with autism can’t concentrate on studies. They can be trained through specially-trained teachers, using specially structured programs that emphasize individual instruction; persons with autism can learn to function at home and in the community. Some can lead nearly normal lives.

More discussions about personality
References in periodicals archive ?
In support of gender differences, the self-reported and other-reported honesty-humility and emotionality dimension of HEXACO model of personality were found to be the strongest predictors of psychopathy across gender, displaying that men have higher psychopathic tendencies as compared to women19.
In current study the variable of personality constitutes only negative personality predispositions, for highlighting the strengths, the positive personality dimensions should also be measured in future studies to overcome the psychopathic tendencies.
Personality scale: The HEXACO Personality Inventory was employed as a measurement of personality.
Like any measurement scale, the maturity, acceptance and evaluation of BPS should start from the legitimate understanding of the construct (brand personality) for which the scale is developed.
One factor that mattered less was the type of therapy a participant used -- no single approach led to greater personality changes than another.
He said that personality should be a major factor used to make personnel decisions.
It is hard to change someone's personality, but managers can do a great deal to affect the environment employees inhabit.
Speaking about it, William Chopik, lead author of the study said that when humans go through big changes in life, their personality traits can change.
To be sure, certain observable aspects of personality are susceptible to measurement, but it is not so simple to measure the deeper and inner aspects of personality and the hidden motives and urges of a person.
Data was collected by administering childhood traumatic questionnaire, young schema questionnaire and personality diagnostic questionnaire.
The most common personality traits were anankastic 1170(88%), schizoid 932(70%) and dependent 705(53%).
How many times have you given a personality test to a new employee or even taken one yourself?