personalism

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personalism

(pĕr′sŭn-ă-lĭzm)
A social theory of health care that stresses the importance of respect for the dignity and individuality of those people for whom care is provided.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chesterton and Hilaire Belloc as built on personalist premises (which it is), he fails to engage or even note the significant body of work of those who see personalism as augmenting, rather than opposing, capitalism and liberalism.
That might be a somewhat accurate description of how preservation of the self is understood in traditional theism, but that is not how it is understood in the personalist spirituality that is the perspective from which my essay is written.
The Personalist contends that reality itself is personal, and persons possess infinite dignity and worth because called into existence by the Supreme Person of the universe.
Thus, although the Catholic Action personalists aimed at a rejuvenated Catholic spirituality as a source of social unity in the modern world, by the early 1960s the impact of their efforts made religion a contested and extremely volatile cultural terrain within Quebec.
Politically the personalists espoused a policy of engagement: the active application of philosophical principles to human situations.
The immediate problem for personalist economics is how to square
While I certainly make no pretense at being anything close to a Bertrand Russell, I do hope that, like him, I can offer some observations on an aspect of Buddhism that has been in perennial conflict with the personalist element of theistic spirituality and, in doing so, in a small way do for Buddhism what Russell did for Christianity, by encouraging a broader discussion and, I hope, clarification of this central Buddhist position.
Early Personalists included this focus in their metaphysical writings but they did not clarify for us how they moved from the metaphysical claim of sociality to the working out of a meaningful social ethic.
The phenomenological material would also have been enriched if some of the recent Catholic understanding of the person (also phenomenological in nature) had been included; I am thinking here of the work of Ratzinger, Wojtyla, and other personalists.
In fact, that we have incommunicable subjectivity, personalists hold, is the best philosophical basis for the Kantian norm that persons are to be treated as ends rather than mere means.
He has mastered a vast range of contemporary literature, from the dialogical model of the personalists to the treatments of accountability, freedom, and punishment by analytic philosophers.
Second, I show how important twentieth-century personalists explicitly reject Kant's metaphysics and epistemology.