personalism

(redirected from personalists)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

personalism

(pĕr′sŭn-ă-lĭzm)
A social theory of health care that stresses the importance of respect for the dignity and individuality of those people for whom care is provided.
References in periodicals archive ?
How would the adoption of a personalist economics change current practice?
Gifford is having none of it: tracing the "relations among thought, form, and praxis" in the poetic, literary, and critical writings of the "Personalists" (notably Treece, Alex Comfort, Dylan Thomas, Durrell, Duncan, D.H.
included my short essay, "Personalist Spirituality and Buddhist Anatman: Reflections on Contrasting Subjectivities, or Why I Am Not (Quite) (Yet) a Buddhist," (1) as well as a response to my essay by Jayarava Attwood, "Facing Death without a Soul: A Response to George Adams." (2) Although the following remarks are in response to Attwood's interpretation of my essay, I hope that they have implications for the larger ongoing dialogue between Buddhists and theists over the nature of the self.
Early Personalists pointed to the communal nature of reality, but in their ethical writings and practice the individual person was always given the right of way.
The Catholicism of the modern masses, personalists maintained, could only be reinvigorated by the energies supplied by a new spiritual elite, whose chief quality was an unmitigated, Promethean scorn for the old conventions of Catholic spirituality.(58) Within these intellectual circles, it was fashionable to decry what was termed "traditional" French Canadian Catholic piety, dismissing it as hopelessly credulous, routinized, and anti-intellectual, utterly lacking in holiness and heroism, and thoroughly pervaded with decadent bourgeois sensibilities.
Although the personalists opposed individualism in its definition as:
While I certainly make no pretense at being anything close to a Bertrand Russell, I do hope that, like him, I can offer some observations on an aspect of Buddhism that has been in perennial conflict with the personalist element of theistic spirituality and, in doing so, in a small way do for Buddhism what Russell did for Christianity, by encouraging a broader discussion and, I hope, clarification of this central Buddhist position.
The immediate problem for personalist economics is how to square
The phenomenological material would also have been enriched if some of the recent Catholic understanding of the person (also phenomenological in nature) had been included; I am thinking here of the work of Ratzinger, Wojtyla, and other personalists. The interesting discussions of the importance of the body given by Hersch in his welcome and persistent critique of Cartesian dualism would perhaps have benefited from the contributions of George Lakoff and Mark Johnson's Philosophy in the Flesh: The Embodied Mind and its Challenge to Western Thought (New York: Basic Books, 1999).
He has mastered a vast range of contemporary literature, from the dialogical model of the personalists to the treatments of accountability, freedom, and punishment by analytic philosophers.
For, Breckman contends, the opposition of the personalists, who read sovereignty as a singular disposition of will on par with that of a singular God, drives the leftist Hegelians to a rejection of the individual as the site of social reality, while at the same time forcing them toward a substitution of an equally unified, if universal and worldly, "subject" to take up the dispensation of political reality.
First, I outline Kraynak's account of Kantianism, noting how he ascribes it to personalists. Second, I show how important twentieth-century personalists explicitly reject Kant's metaphysics and epistemology.