personalism

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personalism

(pĕr′sŭn-ă-lĭzm)
A social theory of health care that stresses the importance of respect for the dignity and individuality of those people for whom care is provided.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a marked departure from dominant theories that claim personalistic regimes are least vulnerable to infighting, Lee claims that the exercise of discretionary power by a personalist dictator fosters more factionalism within the armed forces.
Beer closes The Philanthropic Revolution with thoughts about how to revive the personalist, localist tradition of charity in our society.
In the words of John Paul II, the Personalist principle "is an attempt to translate the commandment of love into the language of philosophical ethics.
If these are accurate standards for identifying a personalist system or thinker, then St.
Unlike Heschel, however, Green is not able to accept a personalist view of God, even though, like Heschel, Green affirms that "there is a God who seeks us out.
The effect of democracy aid in lowering the risk of multiparty failure is found to be particularly strong in countries which have high levels of prior party institutionalization and which have never been ruled by a personalist dictator.
That might be a somewhat accurate description of how preservation of the self is understood in traditional theism, but that is not how it is understood in the personalist spirituality that is the perspective from which my essay is written.
The trend of ethics which is based on personalist philosophy does underline dignity of the person from its conception until his or her natural (biological) death.
Personalist dictators are despots who destroy pre-existing social and political institutions; as a result, they eliminate rival centers of power where would-be opponents might organize and plot.
As a result, the configuration of the country's industrial management could be characterized by a patriarchal personalist logic, similarly to what can be found in patrimonialist societies.
This book reveals the extent to which Schmitz continues to be influenced by the personalist phenomenology of Karol Wojtyla and the philosopher-turned-pope's rereading of traditional metaphysics through the lens of human consciousness.
The dictator's regime was profoundly personalist and calibrated along dynastic lines, based on systematic and systemic corruption, but it also included the people in affairs of state on an unprecedentedly massive scale.