personalism

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personalism

(pĕr′sŭn-ă-lĭzm)
A social theory of health care that stresses the importance of respect for the dignity and individuality of those people for whom care is provided.
References in periodicals archive ?
The personalist movement in France was largely centred around two groups, l'Ordre Nouveau (f.
That which characterizes personalist economics is a focus
Given the permanence and the importance of these three dimensions, which constitute Mounier's personalist inheritance (Villanueva 2005, 21-2), we will now analyse each one of them in greater detail.
''I respect the recent statements made by President Duterte and the decision of the PDP-LBN regarding their preferred senatorial bets,'' Estrada said of his non-inclusion in the President's personalist list of senatorial candidates.
Although he spoke more of his seminary and graduate training in personalist theology and democratic socialism, he was still a black Baptist minister who stepped into a role that had been waiting for him since slavery's end.
He covers origins, French personalism, other personalist currents, and personalist philosophy: a proposal.
Decades later, he learned that each book he was smuggling to Massoud was being translated into Farsi and used as a guide on how to transform the MEK into a personalist cult dedicated to serving the will of its leader, Massoud.
Using a measure of personalism constructed from historical data, we trace the consolidation of personal power in the North Korean regime and compare it to other communist regimes in the region to show how the evolution of personalist rule in these cases differed.
One of the hallmarks of Republic of Vietnam President Ngo Dinh Diem's regime (1955-63) was its concerted effort to bring about a Personalist Revolution (Cdch Mang Nhdn Vi) throughout the Vietnamese nation.
As three American political scientists wrote in a widely cited journal piece earlier this century: 'No two personalist dictators or two military regimes have gone to war with each other since 1945.'
To observers and Chinese intellectuals, however, the news is reminiscent of the personalist style of Mao Zedong, the nation's autocratic founder whose rule became synonymous with economic and social upheaval.