personalism


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personalism

(pĕr′sŭn-ă-lĭzm)
A social theory of health care that stresses the importance of respect for the dignity and individuality of those people for whom care is provided.
References in periodicals archive ?
Specialists such as Petit (2006, 25-91), Possenti (2006, 263-77), Campanini (2005) or Bely (1999, 94-108 and 2005, 215-32) have for instance, devoted themselves, for the past two decades, to highlighting the contribution of Christian theology in the construction of Mounier's personalism.
There is now a wide body of research on authoritarian politics that utilizes measures of personalism, in particular the categorical regime typology pioneered by Geddes (1999).
These conclusions would almost certainly have been revised in favour of a more nuanced position if Stewart had consulted some of the numerous texts on Personalism published in the Ngo Dinh Diem era.
Smith's self-identified theoretical influences are (a) substantive definitions of religion that identify what religion is, in contrast to functional definitions that identify what it does; (b) the critical realist philosophy of science that combines ontological realism, epistemic perspectivalism, and judgmental rationality; and (c) the social theory of personalism, which argues that "humans have a particular nature that is defined by our biologically grounded yet emergently real personal being and its features" (p.
Developing Dietrich von Hildebrand's Personalism, JOHN F.
Van Kersbergen offered the keen insight that by turning the angle of the kaleidoscope, Christian Democracy attempts to transform liberal individualism into personalism. Personalism recognizes that man belongs neither to enterprise nor to the state.
Lee's central argument is that whereas personalism within the armed forces creates apt conditions for the defection of disaffected senior officers, military defection is unlikely to occur in non-personalistic authoritarian regimes where the armed forces are more likely to put down popular demonstrations.
McNerney appeals to a diverse, interdisciplinary set of thinkers, putting special emphasis on the work of Eric Voegelin, Bernard Lonergan, Joseph Schumpeter, and the personalism of Wojtyla and others.
Nonetheless, he concludes that Maritain's stance may unintentionally open the door to a decadent and subjectivistic personalism that licenses man to impose meaning on the world.
(By the early 1940s, Personalism's theoretical epicentre is clearly Britain and its international network develops from this base.)
Lee boils the answer down to what he calls increased personalism of the autocrat as well as within the Philippine and Indonesian militaries.
The aforementioned thinkers by Latvian and Russian philosophy historians are often referred to as the 'Tartu school of personalism' (Priedite 1991:9).