person-centred care

(redirected from person-focused care)

person-centred care

A popular term for healthcare and social services which reflect the individual’s unique preferences, values and needs, identified and agreed upon in partnership with the physician. Under Person-Centred Care, Standard 2 of the National Service Framework (NSF) for Older People, people should be treated as individuals and receive appropriate and timely care that meets their needs.

For people with learning disabilities, such care entails life planning based around the principles of social disability. The importance of a Person-Centred approach has also been reinforced with its inclusion in the NSF for Long-Term Conditions 2005; with the movement towards dignity in a hospital setting; and an increasing awareness of its importance when working with people with dementia, concentrating on what they can do rather than what they are not able to do. The DH, health and social care agencies increasingly prefer “individual” or “person” rather than traditional, organisational terms such as customer, client, service user or (when appropriate) patient.
References in periodicals archive ?
3) In contrast to patient-centered care (at least as described in the current literature with assessments that are visit-based), person-focused care is based on accumulated knowledge of people, which provides the basis for better recognition of health problems and needs over time and facilitates appropriate care for these needs in the context of other needs.
These produce greater first-contact access/use, better person-focused care over time, an expanded range of services, and better co-ordination of care.
Mere presence of primary care clinicians does not assure availability and accessibility and does not guarantee that existing primary care facilities provide a level of primary care adequate to attain the four cardinal features of first contact use, person-focused care over time, comprehensiveness of services available and provided, and coordination of care.
Second, our sample consisted entirely of family physicians practicing in the community, where the model of person-focused care may have a longer history of support and endorsement or be of greater importance to community family physicians, whose emphasis is on a breadth of care based on patient needs.
The areas most lacking in the existing research literature are studies of attributes that are clearly specified in all definitions of primary care: person-focused care over time (longitudinality), care for all but uncommon problems in the population (comprehensiveness), and integration of all aspects of care (coordination), as well as first-contact care.