viremia

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viremia

 [vi-re´me-ah]
the presence of viruses in the blood.

vi·re·mi·a

(vī-rē'mē-ă),
The presence of a virus in the bloodstream.
[virus + G. haima, blood]

viremia

/vi·re·mia/ (vi-re´me-ah) the presence of viruses in the blood.

viremia

(vī-rē′mē-ə)
n.
The presence of viruses in the bloodstream.

vi·re′mic (-mĭk) adj.

viremia

[vīrē′mē·ə]
Etymology: L, virus + Gk, haima, blood
the presence of viruses in the blood. Also spelled viraemia. Compare bacteremia, fungemia, parasitemia.

viraemia

The presence of viral particles in the circulation.

viremia

Presence of viral particles in the circulation

vi·re·mi·a

(vī-rē'mē-ă)
The presence of a virus in the bloodstream.
Synonym(s): viraemia.

viraemia

or

viremia

presence of virus particles in the bloodstream.

Viremia

The measurable presence of virus in the bloodstream that is a characteristic of acute retroviral syndrome.
Mentioned in: AIDS

vi·re·mi·a

(vī-rē'mē-ă)
The presence of a virus in the bloodstream.
Synonym(s): viraemia.

viremia (vīrē´mēə),

n an elevation of virus levels occurring 2 to 4 weeks after infection with HIV.

viremia

the presence of viruses in the blood either as free virus or a cell associated viremia. In generalized virus infections there may be local invasion, proliferation in regional lymph nodes, followed by primary viremia with dissemination to other tissues. For some infections there may be a secondary viremia followed by increasing tissue damage and severe clinical disease sometimes including spread of virus to the central nervous system.

persistent viremia
virus can be isolated from the blood for periods longer than a few days.
References in periodicals archive ?
The results demonstrated persistent viremia for 47 days and viruria for 61 days after illness onset (Table).
It is currently not possible to determine whether the mutation arose due to the persistent viremia and/or the antibody deficiency, triggered it, or contributed to the mutation.
Some veterinarians feel that the benefits of annual vaccinations beyond the first annual booster are outweighed by the risk of vaccination-site sarcoma and the reduced risk of developing persistent viremia in cats that are older than two years of age.
Alternatively, perhaps true antibody-positive participants did not have positive RT-PCR results because they had cleared HCV viremia; however, in the industrialized world, most antibody-positive persons have persistent viremia.

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