perseverate

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Related to perseverations: perseverative, preservation

perseverate

(pər-sĕv′ə-rāt′)
intr.v. persever·ated, persever·ating, persever·ates Psychology
To manifest or experience perseveration.

per·sev′er·a′tive adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the ANCOVA analysis of perseverations (M = 0.41, SD = 0.84, range 0-4), the main effect of TC was significant [F(1,35) = 10.60, p = .003, classical [[eta].sup.2] = 16], with participants with TC < 155 mg/dL committing significantly less perseverations (least squares M = 0.36) than participants with TC [greater than or equal to] 155 mg/dL (least squares M = 1.05).
Other errors at this stage are anticipations or perseverations of hand shapes to adjacent cells.
Groups were compared separately on the number of close errors in difficult single target search and on the number of perseverations in alternating search, using VMA as a covariate in each case.
For example, verbal perseverations (the repetition of a previous response, or part of a previous response) are very common in dementia.
In addition, significant differences between groups were observed in omissions, perseverations, and rotation for the BVRT memory task: DD committed more of those types of errors.
Hawley, "Verbal perseveration in individuals with Alzheimer's disease," Seminars in Speech and Language, vol.
For example, in the TAVEC test, alcoholic groups showed a significantly higher number of perseverations than the CTR group, which denoted low cognitive control.
In the current study the total number of responses (WCSTI), total number of perseverations (WCST2), and percentage of perseveration errors (WCST3) were taken into account as these scores are extensively used in these kinds of studies (27).
Incorrect responses and any cross linguistic errors, perseverations, two or more repetitions of the same item, were considered as incorrect items.
However, Sebastian, Menor and Elosua (2001), found that the ADs mainly committed a large number of perseverations and they interpreted those in terms of executive problems, that is, the ADs could not switch their attention to the following item presented, and their attention remained <<anchored>> in the previously remembered item.
However, besides these typical symptoms of KBS, our case showed some other symptoms [such as hyperactivity, impulsivity, aggressive behaviors, excessive talking, indifference to relationships, and motor/verbal perseverations (manifested as asking the same questions or using the same sentences too many times, and asking for hand shaking frequently while shaking his own hand)] which could be difficult to explain by the diagnosis of KBS.